Pagan Blog Project: X is for Greek Wind Rose (free topic)

A Greek Wind Rose is a classical compass which was used in the Mediterranean by the Hellenics and Romans.  The Greek Wind Rose typically shows the points of orientation, directions and the names of the winds all which correlate.  The classical wind rose is the Greek Wind Rose as seen below:

Greek_12-wind_rose

The philosopher Aristotle in his Meteorology (c 340 BCE) created the 12 wind system which is seen below. 8 are principle winds: Aparctias (N), Caecias (NE), Apeliotes (E), Eurus (SE), Notos (S), Lips (SW), Zephyrus ( W ) and Argestes (NW) and two are half winds: Thrascias (NNW) and Meses (NNE).  Aristotle made an addition with the Phoenicias wind for the SSE but didn’t suggest any for the SSW.

Aristotle’s wind rose (correspondence to modern compass directions)

North (N) Aparctias (ἀπαρκτίας)
(variant Boreas (βoρέας))
the top meridian
North-Northeast (NNE) Meses (μέσης) the polar “rise”
Northeast (NE) Caecias (καικίας) the summer sunrise
East (E) Apeliotes (ἀπηλιώτης) the equinox sunrise
Southeast (SE) Eurus (εὖρος)
(variant Euronoti (εὐρόνοτοι))
the winter sunrise
South-Southeast (SSE) No wind
(except local Phoenicias (φοινικίας)
South (S) Notos (νότος) the bottom meridian.
South-Southwest (SSW) No wind
Southwest (SW) Lips (λίψ) the winter sunset
West ( W ) Zephyrus (ζέφυρος) the equinox sunset
Northwest (NW) Argestes (ἀργέστης)(Variants: Olympias(ὀλυμπίας),
Sciron (σκίρων)
the summer sunset.
North-Northwest (NNW) Thrascias (θρασκίας) the polar “set”

 

(c) T. Georgitsis 2014

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