Starlit Path: Volume 2, Issue 1 Spring 2019: Walking with the Goddess, “Hekate’s Herbalist”

In this issue, for my column Walking With the Goddess, I share a poem I wrote to my patron Hekate as her devotee and avid herbalist called, “Hekate’s Herbalist”.

There are also some wonderful articles in this issue, including a Cord Spell, The Spell Cord and Meditation: Purification by Flame, which is very Hekate-centric in my opinion and a great addition to one’s practice to the Goddess.

The Starlit Path is a free magazine which can be downloaded here: Starlitpath Spring 2019

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Starlit Path: Issue 4 Winter 2018: Walking with the Goddess, “How to Set up a Personal Practice”

My new column Walking With the Goddess is series of regular articles building on devotional practice from the ground up.

My third column in this series is “How to Set up a Personal Practice”

The Starlit Path is a free magazine which can be downloaded here: Starlit Path Winter 2018

Isis Great of Magic; Iset Werethekau

Isiopolis

“Great of Magic” is absolutely my favorite and most-used epithet of the Goddess. It is Her power name. It is the one that gives me tingles at the back of my neck when I say it. It is the one that invokes Her deepest core, Her magical heart, the ones that makes me want to kiss the ground before Her beautiful and fierce face. I have turned several Sakhmet sacred images into Werethekau for my altar with the addition of a serpent around Their shoulders. You’ll see why that works below.

“O, Isis, Great of Magic, deliverme from all bad, evil, and typhonic things…” —Ebers Papyrus, 1500 BCE

Werethekau as a winged Cobra Goddess Werethekau as a winged Cobra Goddess (photo by Mark Williams)

One of Isis’ most powerful epithets is “Great of Magic,” which you may also see translated as Great One of Magic, Great Sorceress, or Great Enchantress. In Egyptian, it is

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Book Review: Daughter of The Sun edited by Tina Georgitsis

The Pagan Collective of Victoria

Review: Daughter of the Sun – A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Sekhmet
edited by Tina Georgitsis

Reviewed by Ryan McLeod

It’s a strange experience discovering a God or Goddess that is unfamiliar to you for the first time.

You may have come across them in a classical painting, a reference in a poem or a book on mythology it catches your imagination or has a spark of recognition. It encourage to find out more and search through obscure references books looking for the earliest of references and may even push you further explore the culture or history of the people that originally worshipped your new God. And that’s why it’s been such a pleasure to review Daughter of the Sun – A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Sekhmet.

Sekhmet is a Goddess I really knew very little about. The joy of this anthology is the diverse views and perspectives…

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Is Isis a Moon Goddess or a Sun Goddess?

Isiopolis

A lovely painting of a lunar Isis by artist Katana Leigh. Visit her site here. A lovely painting of a lunar Isis by artist Katana Leigh. Visit her site here.

As we fast approach the time when Night and Day, Moon and Sun come into a brief and beautiful balance, I’d like to share this post about Isis’ lunar and solar natures.

Modern Pagans often think of Isis as a Moon Goddess. And, it’s true, in later periods of Her worship, She was indeed associated with the Moon—and, in fact, that’s how She entered the Western Esoteric Tradition. The Isis-Moon connection first started when Egypt came under Greek rule in the 3rd century BCE, following the conquest by Alexander the Great. To the Greeks, Goddesses were the lunar Deities, so as Isis made Her way into Greek culture and hearts, Her new devotees naturally associated Her with the Moon.

In Egypt, Osiris, Khons, Thoth, and I’ah were the Deities most associated with the Moon. Isis…

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