Isis/A’set Magic: Devotional Rite

 
(C) Setjataset – Kemetic A’set Shrine

I have been a devotee of Isis/A’set for decades as she was my first matron.  Having been fascinated with Ancient Egypt due to a familial connection She was the first deity who called to me when I first started practicing my family’s magickal practices (which were Hermetic and Greek/Egyptian Folk Magick centric). 

Who is Isis/Aset – I have written about her before on this blog, specifically her role as Mistress of Magic which has been her dominate force in my practice, which you can read here:

Who is Isis?


I self-dedicated to Isis/A’set as her devotee at age 18 and then when I joined my first magickal group at 21, chose the magickal name A’set in her honour and trained and taught as her Priestess (Elphame Wicca).  

Joining the Fellowship of Isis later on I undertook training in Lyceums (training schools within the Fellowship of Isis) and became a Hierophant Priestess through rigorous path-working study, opening my own Lyceum a decade later.  

Craving more knowledge I joined the House of Netjer (a kemetic temple) in the middle of my FOI studies and was divined as the daughter of A’set/Serqet and took the divined name Setjataset (A’set ushers her in) and briefly trained as her Sau and remain as a Divined Remetj to this day.


(C) Setjataset – FOI Shrine to Isis

I devoured any academia and magickal books I could find on Isis/A’set and her practice and also trained in the vibrational healing modality Isis Seichim to further my devotion to her.  

Isis/A’set was the one who led me to Hekate during a Dark Night of the Soul and as such I became Hekate’s devotee and Priestess with the guidance of Isis/A’set.

To this day I maintain a devout Priestess to Isis/A’set and tend to her shrine regularly and enact various rites and magick in her name (both group and solitary work through my Lyceum of Heka as well as my healing and reading work).

Below I have written a ritual for a devotional to A’set which I have been using for years in group and solitary work. I find this rite quite beneficial to strengthen your connection to this goddess.

Rite to A’set by Setjataset © 2004

Start this rite just before sunset.

Shrine faces east and has some unlit incense, a blue candle, anointing oil, a bowl of rose water, A’set statue and an offering for A’set placed upon it.

Begin by standing with both arms relaxed by your side before your shrine.

Light some incense and then draw the Invoking Ankh followed by the Invoking Eye of Horus before you, behind you, to your left, right, above, below and within you. 

Light the blue candle.

Take the rose water and sprinkle it over the A’set statue.  Now take the anointing oil and anoint the statue of Isis on the third eye area of her forehead.

Lift both hands and arms from your elbows up before you, with palms facing upwards and say:

“Dua-ur-ntr Anedj-Rak Ne-fer A-set.”

(Adorations and greetings to you beautiful Isis.) 

Repeat the following Hymn to A’set:

“Ra is in celebration!

The heart exults in joy

For your heart is soft and sweet O Goddess!

Isis Queen of the World and Her son Horus

He is King upon the Throne of His Father

Governing both poles

The Seat of Geb is in Her possession

The function of Atum is in Her hand

The strength of Mentu is in Her grasp

The divinity who produces the beginning

And fills the Sky and Earth with Her perfection

This Crown who bright in Gold appears

Auguste is Her sign

Lives in the House Divine

Sovereign of the Gods of the Sky

Queen of the Gods of Earth

Falcon also of Gods of the Tuat

The Mistress of Bright Glory

On the Throne is Her command

It is the one Her heart desires

Who is chosen to ascend the Throne

Without violence they ascend the Palace

One call, one desire to see

The Honour of the Country and everything whole

It is by Her order that the Temple is blessed

With the return of Her brother!

Her name is pronounced and the world is loyal to Her”(1)

Cross hands over chest in Osiris Position and meditate, pray or send her a petition of askance.

After this is completed place the offering to Isis before her statue and say:

“Ho-tep A-set” (Peace and Offerings A-set).

Farewell A’set by repeating the following:

“O Holy Blessed Lady

Constant comfort to humankind

Whose beneficence and kindness nourish us all

And whose care for those in trouble is as 

A loving Mother who cares for all Her Children

You are there when we call

Stretching our your hand to put aside

That which is harmful to us

Untangling the web of fate in which we may be caught

Even stopping the stars if they form a harmful pattern

All other deities

Whether bountiful or merciless

Do reverence to Thee

For it is Isis who rules the world

Stamping out the powers of evil

Arranging the stars to give us answers

Causing the seasons to come and go

Commanding the winds to move ships

Giving the clouds to water the growing seeds

So that we may have food

If I have one thousand mouths

And one thousand tongues in each

Still I could not do justice to Thy Majesty

Yet I will forever remember your help in my time of need

And keep your blessed image deep within my heart.”(2)

Let blue candle burn all the way down (Note: Never leave a lit candle unattended.).

Leave offering on shrine for at least 24 hours and use appropriately.

_____________________________________________________________________ 

Footnotes:

(1) Traditional Hymn to Isis taken from a wall at her Temple in Philae.

(2) Prayer from Om Sety at the Abydos Temple.

 

If you are interested in training in the Fellowship of Isis as a Priest/Priestess my Lyceum of Heka is now taking students – for further information please go here:

Lyceum of Heka


(C) T. Georgitsis 2021

Books on Hekate

I have updated this list to include new or upcoming books or ones I feel should be included in Hekate related books 😀

Setjataset

Some (if not most) devotees, priests, witches, magicians and practitioners of Hekate love to find out more about her from a historical, modern, personal, religious and magical point of view.  They love to read and research Hekate, and therefore tend to devour everything they can find, which is written and discussed on Her.

For me personally, I like to collect books on Hekate for my personal library.  I do this so I can understand academic’s research and study on Hekate as well as individual’s personal experience and interpretation on her. I love to read how Hekate manifests for others who have a deep interest, love and respect for Hekate.  Although I don’t necessarily agree or resonate with everything I read, I find it expands my perspective and knowledge about her in a more well rounded way.

Over the last few years I have noticed more books being written on Hekate which can…

View original post 720 more words

Resolutions 2021

Many create resolutions at the beginning of the new year.  These resolutions can include getting rid of a bad habits or introducing a good one.  Resolutions tend to be created and promises made – which usually (if not always) fall by the wayside.

This is why I as I have described before I personally do not create resolutions.  What I like to do is set intentions of what I want to undergo for the year with the focus being on what new “experience” I want to learn or immerse myself in.

Last year what quite an intense one and as such most of my time was spent on survival and self-care.

My focus for the year is listed below in bold, whilst my achievements are listed beneath with supporting lists, links or photographs.

Read and re-read books which inspire and/or move me:

GoodRead List 2020

I didn’t read as many books as I usually do due to spending a lot of time reading academic papers on Academia as well as subscribing to Medium and reading various articles there by independent writers.

Support more artists creating hand-made/self-published items born from their hard work, research, study and/or imagination:

Miss Marley Art

The Woodpecker

TitchyYosies

MUMA

LeRoux Manor

The Quirky Cup Collective

Luna Noire Creations

Rapt n Hide

B Inspired Art

Woodspinning

Fiona Ariva

Reclaimed Red Gum Eucalyptus Floating Ledges (c) The Woodpecker

Support a charity I resonate with:

Share the Dignity

Guide Dog Australia

Run For Refugees

Sister Works

STEPtember

Meow Rescue

Cotton On Foundation

Nefertiti & Ramesses (c) T. Georgitsis

Visit somewhere I haven’t been before which has a spirit of place:

Dromana Beach (been there as a child but not as an adult).

Mornington peninsular (visited various places of the area).

Healesville Sanctuary

Dromana Beach 12/2020 (c) T. Georgitsis

Dromana Beach 12/2020 (c) T. Georgitsis

Complete a workshop/course which is connected to my interests, passions and causes I like to support:

Handwriting Course (Cursive)

Caligraphy Course 

Self Publishing Workshop

Librarian Course 

Create something magical which feeds and inspires my practice:

Painting with acrylics – submitted and accepted to Gallery Exhibit 5 x 9 (painting sold)

Photography of Spirit of Place – submitted and accepted to Optica 2020 Exhibit

Card Making with Kemetic, Hellenic, Magical and Witch Themes

Letter Writing by Hand

Typewriter Poetry

Journalling which included a pandemic diary, magical spell book, magical grimoire and poetic journal with mixed media, watercolour, acrylic and ink drawings.

Blogging – Occult/Magical and Creative Writing 

Craft Making (candles, soap, anointing oils, incense blends, herb bundles)

Cooking various new meals which includes celebratory offerings 

Created new spells utilising Greek Folk Magic practises 

Planted more herbs and focused on cultivating and preserving ones used in Greek and Egyptian magic.

“Blue” 9×5 Exhibition (C) T. Georigitsis

“Diva Connection” Optika20 (c) T. Georgitsis

Attended Conference with a Magical/Spiritual Slant :

AWC 2020

HoN End of Year Festivities – Epagomenial Days & Wep Ronpet 

LIFE is about experiences and the way I feel when I – create, visit or support something which inspires and uplifts me.  I find its easier to get energised and complete set objectives if I find personal purpose within the task before me.

Therefore my suggestion for those wanting to set resolutions who then struggle to fulfil them, is to instead write a wish list of intentions, of things you would like to do – to feed your soul and go from there.  That way there is less pressure as the focus is more pleasure in your life.

(C) T Georgitsis – all images and text 2020

Athenian Calendar 2020/21 (Southern Hemisphere)

Image by Konstantin Arzumanidis

The best time to honor Hekate is the Deipnon and Noumenia.  With that said, every year I create an Athenian Calendar to calculate the Deipnon and Noumenia using the Southern Hemisphere New Moons, to ensure my devotions are on the right evenings for my location.  This is calculated by the start off point of the Summer Solstice in Greece of that particular year.

The Athenian Calendar also known as the Attic Calendar was a lunisolar calendar used during the classical period of Ancient Greece during the 4th and 5th Centuries BC.  It was exclusively used in Athens at the time and each month starts at the first sighting of the new moon, with the year beginning just after mid-summer.  It’s become a modern go to for practicing Hellenics and as such, what we use and have today is a reconstruction of what they used around 300-500 BC.  I have superimposed this Athenian Calendar over our modern Gregorian one, to loosely create a festival calendar of 12 months based on the cycle of the moon which starts at the beginning of the Athenian year – on the summer solstice in Athens. The names of the months reflect the gods and festivals honoured at that time and have agricultural links to the planting or harvesting of food in the northern hemisphere.

Here is what the yearly Athenian Calendar basically looks like:

Summer (Θέρος)

1          Hekatombaion (Ἑκατομβαιών)           July/August

2          Metageitnion (Μεταγειτνιών)             August/September (named after Apollo)

3          Boedromion (Βοηδρομιών)                September/October

Autumn (Φθινόπωρον)

4          Pyanepsion (Πυανεψιών)                    October/November

5          Maimakterion (Μαιμακτηριών)          November/December (named after Zeus)

6          Poseideon (Ποσειδεών)                      December/January

Winter (Χεῖμα)

7          Gamelion (Γαμηλιών)                         January/February

8          Anthesterion (Ἀνθεστηριών)              February/March (named after the festival of Anthesteria)

9          Elaphebolion (Ἑλαφηβολιών)             March/April

Spring (Ἔαρ)

10        Mounichion (Μουνιχιών)                    April/May

11        Thargelion (Θαργηλιών)                     May/June

12        Skirophorion (Σκιροφοριών)              June/July

 

Every month lasts for approximately 29-30 days in total.  Each month is broken up into 10 days of three which reflect the moon phases in the following order: Waxing, Full and Waning Moons.

Days 1 to 8 were all sacred to gods or spirit entities and the last day of the month, known as “hene kai nea” translated as “the old and the new”, is dedicate to Hekate as it’s her Deipnon along with the first day of the month, Noumenia which is also dedicated to Hekate.

Here are the details of those 8 sacred days in the Athenian Calendar month:

Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon)

Day 2: Agathos Daimon

Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

Day 29-30: Deipnon

To get you all started with adapting the Athenian Calendar to the Gregorian one, here is the Athenian Calendar I created for 2021, calculated for Southern Hemisphere practitioners:

21 June 2020 (12.43am), = Summer Solstice in Greece (Winter Solstice in Australia 21st June 7.43am AEST)

 

Summer (Θέρος)

1 Hekatombaion (Ἑκατομβαιών)

21 July – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 3.32am Athenian New Year 

22 July – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

23 July – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

24 July – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

26 July – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

27 July – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

28 July – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

17-18 August – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

2 Metageitnion (Μεταγειτνιών) (named after Apollo)

19 August – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 12.41pm

20 August – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

21 August – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

22 August – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

24 August – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

25 August – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

26 August – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

15-16 September – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

3 Boedromion (Βοηδρομιών)

17 September – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 9.00pm

18 September – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

19 September – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

20 September – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

22 September – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

23 September – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

24 September – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

15-16 October – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

Autumn (Φθινόπωρον)

4 Pyanepsion (Πυανεψιών)

17 October – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 6.31am

18 October – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

19 October – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

20 October – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

22 October – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

23 October – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

24 October – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

13-14 November – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

5 Maimakterion (Μαιμακτηριών) (named after Zeus)

15 November – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 4.07pm

16 November – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

17 November – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

18 November – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

20 November – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

21 November – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

22 November – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

13-14 December – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

6 Poseideon (Ποσειδεών)

15 December – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 3.06am

28 November – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

29 November – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

30 November – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

2 December – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

3 December – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

4 December – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

12-13 January – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

Winter (Χεῖμα)

7 Gamelion (Γαμηλιών)

13 January – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 4.00pm

14 January – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

15 January – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

16 January – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

18 January – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

19 January – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

20 January – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

10-11 February – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

8 Anthesterion (Ἀνθεστηριών) (named after the festival of Anthesteria)

12 February – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 6.05am

13 February – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

14 February – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

15 February – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

17 February- Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

18 February – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

19 February – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

11-12 March  – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

9 Elaphebolion (Ἑλαφηβολιών)

13 March – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 9.21pm

14 March – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

15 March – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

16 March – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

18 March – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

19 March – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

20 March – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

10-11 April – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

Spring (Ἔαρ)

10 Mounichion (Μουνιχιών)

12 April – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 12.30pm

13 April – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

14 April – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

15 April – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

17 April – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

18 April – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

19 April – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

10-11 May – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

11 Thargelion (Θαργηλιών) 

12 May – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 4.59am

13 May – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

14 May – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

15 May – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

17 May – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

18 May – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

19 May – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

8-9 June – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

12 Skirophorion (Σκιροφοριών)   

10 June – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 8.52pm

11 June – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

12 June – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

13 June – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

15 June – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

16 June – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

17 June – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

8-9 July – Day 29-30: Deipnon

(C) T. Georgitsis 2021

Hekate Devotion: An Open Letter

To those who think they can dictate how others experience the divine,

From a personal perspective – MY practice, magick and spirituality is my own.  My research, dedication and ongoing development have led me to where I find myself today.  I work with existing systems and yet it is tailored, modified and individualised to my own preferences.  One hand in modern and the other in ancient practices is the path I tred.  It is my own blend as I take what works and discard what doesn’t.  My taste might not resonate with yours which is completely ok as YMMV.

With that said, I own my own path and the power I yield I do so for my personal development, therefore:

My spirituality is not made to placate you.

My practice is not created for your comfort.

My magick is not worked for your satisfaction.

So to those:

  • Talking down to others is rude and shows your arrogance as you do not demand an audience.
  • Mansplaining makes you look like a domineering person afraid of individual self empowerment.
  • Exhibiting belittling behaviour is unwarranted as is the obedience of another. You are owed nothing except common courtesy and respect which you should have the decency to show yourself.
  • Dictating your point of view which is not accepted blindly – frustrates you, which in some cases you turn into lashed out anger which makes you look controlling and lacking confidence.

So to those who struggle with people who tell you how to be and how to practice – simply give them no attention, pay them no mind, don’t give in to their tendencies to be antagonistic towards you because simply put – they are not worth the energy and time.

Perhaps they are envious of your ways otherwise they wouldn’t chose to be so focused towards what you are doing and instead put that vigour towards their own workings (instead of trying to lord over yours).

Remember – NO ONE can control you, this is YOUR path!  What you owe is to yourself and to your God/s. Do your thing and don’t apologise for it.

Hail Hekate

Setjataset


© T. Georgitsis 2020

Dancing for Hekate

Dance has long been regarded as a exemplary way to elevate one’s soul in a spiritual way. Dance has been part of religious ceremonies, rites and celebrations from time immemorial. It’s a way to display the myths of various cultures and has been used to pass on traditions of these cultures for generations. Divine dance is a wondrous way to commune and connect with Deity.  This occurs by becoming an instrument attuned through repetitive movement which can induce transcendence. Dance can also be used as a tool for the transmission of healings and blessings which can manifest as a euphoric or peaceful feeling.

Dance allows you to tap into the cosmic consciousness and can raise your vibration. With devotion, dance becomes an offering to the gods and ancestors  – in its essence its alchemy in action. When you move in rhythmic motions it opens you up and fills you with a harmonic energy which expands your perception.  Dance connects you to your primal self yet at the same time can strengthen your sentient link to your higher self.

Dance is a form of moving meditation allowing us to weave the magickal world into the mundane. With dedication and regular practice you can master the various subtle energies around and outside of you, to further develop the bond between you and the cosmic energies and your Gods.  With love and devotion, dance can unfold and manifest into the most beautiful works of art.

Some examples of divine dancing can be seen through Turning Dervish Dance, Zaar Dance, Indian Classical Dance, Sword Dance, Maypole Dance, Cham Dance, Greek Folk Dance and Jewish Worship Dances just to name a few.

I learned how to dance pretty much around the same time I learned to walk.  I was influenced by my family who indulged in this pastime at various celebratory events, as well as my general love of music which would inspire me to get lost in various styles and rhythms.    When I was around 6 I started to attend formal Greek Folk dancing lessons and I didn’t realise at the time how instrumental and what an impact it would have in my devotions to Deity.  Over the years I have tried various forms of dance but the one I always come back to and use regularly for communion with spirit is traditional Egyptian Belly Dance.

Bellydance is one of the oldest types of dance in existence which focuses on isolated yet flowing movements through various parts of the body.  This results in the sensual current of energetic emotion being moulded into a work of artistic expression physically.

Bellydance has given me the confidence to accept myself and my body and connect with it in a loving and honourable way.  It’s taught me that every person is a reflection of the Divine and that we have the confidence and drive within to move forward and tackle any obstacle before us.

I regularly Bellydance for Hekate and this type of devotional act works on balancing my body, mind, spirit and emotions and therefore is quite a wholistic practice which allows healing, learning and growing.  It also allows me to raise energy and direct it to her workings and add quite a punch to my rituals and other magical workings in Her name.  Dancing for Hekate has allowed me to really connect to her in a grounded way which is then transferred into her etherial energy.  Dancing for Hekate has also allowed me to let go of the mundane world and put me in trance allowing me to have a quicker connection to various aspects of her practice such as visionary work.

I find that Bellydancing is very valuable to my Body, Mind, Spirit and Emotion and here are just some of the benefits I have found over the years:

BODY

Bellydance contains naturally fluid movements which work with the female body’s regular dispositions. Due to this, Bellydance strengthens the core, joints and ligaments, tones the muscles, straightens the spine, leads to better developed balance and co-ordination, improves flexibility in a painless and safe manner and improves the digestive system. Repetitive movements found within Bellydance can improve circulation and breath and corrects stiffness which occurs with a predominate sedentary lifestyle.  Even if you only dance for an hour a week, it can severely enhance your cardiovascular capacity and when practiced more often can increase lung capacity.  Your body changes after continued practice of Bellydance and this is due to the fact it’s a weight baring exercise which assists in weight loss, strengthens your bones and shapes your body into its natural graceful state of shape. Bellydance also strengthens the pelvic floor muscle since its predominately used, therefore it can assist with pms, sexual relations and childbirth. This style of dance can also be useful as a rehabilitative exercise as it’s a gentle way of working through an injury when you have received the go ahead to get back into physical workouts.

MIND

Bellydance contains alternating movements, routines and music which regularly allows a change in scenery.  Mixing things up in this way has many mental health benefits as it allows you to enjoy yourself in a pressure free environment. Bellydance is fun and learning it with a within a group environment can not only can elevate you but opens you up to making connections with others. The rhythmic and accompanying movements in Bellydance can also calm and centre you which allows relaxation.  Bellydance also causes stress reduction through stimulating yet soothing the mind as well as the increase of happiness and joy due to being involved in something uplifting. Building your self esteem through the feeling of being liberated through Bellydance is attained as well as connecting to yourself through thoughtful and loving self-discovery.

SPIRIT

Bellydance is a creative outlet which allows a woman to connect to her feminine nature and her natural cycles of her body which is a manifestation of the Goddess within her. Since Bellydance is a ritualised physical and emotional expression it opens one’s ability to honour and connect with deity in a most profound and beautiful way.  This connection has been used for millennia as performances of Bellydance have occurred throughout the ages during various celebrations which includes faith/religious ceremonies, coming of age ceremonies, weddings and fertility rites.

EMOTION

Bellydance allows you to express your emotions through dance and dancing out your stressors is a great way to work through them.  It also helps you forget about your problems and allows you to let things go due to being in the moment with the dance, as quite frankly you just don’t have the time to worry about anything else.  Bellydance can help alleviate the symptoms of depression and anxiety and can enable the sensation of feeling sexy in one’s skin. This style of dance also helps improve body confidence and assurance of one self and accompanying abilities which inspire freedom of expression through a sense of inner strength.

Bellydance has brought me many personal benefits and I am grateful for the body, mind, spirit and emotional benefits I have harvested over the years of dancing this path. As always please see your GP before embarking on a new exercise regime (which includes dancing) and remember that every person is a representation of Deity and Bellydance is a great way to honour God/dess inside and outside of yourself.

Whatever style of dance you are drawn to, try to engage in it regularly as an offering and see how it enhances your magickal and spiritual practice.


 

© T. Georgitsis 2013/14 updated 2020

Hekate Magick: Samhain for her Witches

deipnon-september 2013

Samhain is celebrated as the witches new year and is the time when the veil between the worlds is at its thinnest and therefore perfect for divination or contacting the dead.  Hekate’s connection to witches can be traced back to classical Greece where they worked with her for various incantations, spells and called upon her for assistance and blessings.

Hekate, the Virgin Titaness who prefers solitude, Goddess of the Sea, Earth and Sky, Light Bearer and revealer to those who seek, Keeper of the Crossroads who roams the cemeteries for lost souls, Queen of Magic and the Night, Key Bearer who has access to the otherworld and can commune with those who have passed between the veils, Goddess of Ghosts and Necromancy, Patron of Travellers who guides them to their destination.

Goddess of Witchcraft, Magic and Ghosts – Hekate in my opinion exudes the energy of Samhain. During Samhain, Hekate – the Embodiment of Death, roams the earth and is therefore one of the most suitable Gods to honour during this time.  Since Hekate is known as Goddess of the Dead, Mistress of Souls who can accompany the departed between the realm of the living and that of the dead, witches have naturally been drawn to call upon her during the Festival of the Dead: Samhain also known as Halloween.  Hekate can be called upon as an intermediary to connect you to your ancestors especially since our dearly departed tend to visit us during Samhain.  Also communing with the ancestors during this time can reveal future fate and Hekate can also be of assistance when divining.

Venerating the ancestors and Hekate during this time which also celebrates the last harvest ensures blessings and that fertility to the land is returned in spring.  The ancient Greeks would often leave offerings to Hekate in order for their crops not to fail and for her storm aspect to be pacified.  Considering winter is a time of storms and the earth lays dormant, getting Hekate on your good side with respects to these aspects is forward thinking.

I personally see that during Mabon (Autumn Equinox) is when Hekate, torches in hand, guides and protects Persephone as she descends into the underworld.  At Samhain, Hekate has returned from the Underworld with news from the Dead, as she is one of the few gods who can traverse between all the worlds.

Constructing a dumb supper for Hekate and your ancestors is a wonderful way to honour them both by placing a plate of food that Hekate and your ancestors would appreciate then leaving it on a Hekate or ancestor altar, on a crossroads or on your doorsteps ensures they will take on the essence of the food offered.

Offerings to your ancestors can include food they enjoyed during life and offerings to Hekate that compliments Samhain includes apples, pomegranates, garlic, onion, wine, mead and mugwort tea.

Here is a simple witches ritual for Hekate, Samhain and your ancestors I have composed and used successfully multiple times in years past:

Setjataset Samhain Rite ((C) T. Georgitsis 2010)

Ingredients:

  • Dumb Supper (any of the foods and drinks your ancestors loved in life)
  • Coins (3) – of any denomination which can be donated
  • Incense – dragons blood, frankincense or livani
  • Candles (1-3) – tea lights are easiest but you can use tapers
  • Image of Hekate
  • Key – skeleton if you have it but any key will do
  • Skull – crystal, animal bone or a copy
  • Divination form – tarot cards, scrying bowl, mirror, dice
  • Any offerings you would like infused with the energies of Samhain
  • Pen and Paper

Method:

Prepare a dumb supper and place in the NW of your circle or on the left of your altar/shrine.

Create sacred space or open the shrine.

Light some incense.

Inscribe the candle with the ancestors names you would like to connect with and place before the image of Hekate.

Take the three coins and blow on them before placing them in front of the candle.

Light the candle which has been placed in the middle of your altar before the image of Hekate.  This is used as a beacon so your deceased loved ones can make their way to you.

Have a key and an image of a skull on the left side of your alter/shrine.

Any form of divination should be placed on your shrine after giving the item/s a little shake.

Begin the rite by evoking Hekate with the following Orphic hymn (or any hymn you resonate with which fits the season and purpose):

Hekate Einodia, Trioditis, lovely dame, of earthly, watery, and celestial frame, sepulchral, in a saffron veil arrayed, pleased with dark ghosts that wander through the shade; Perseis, solitary goddess, hail! The world’s key-bearer, never doomed to fail; in stags rejoicing, huntress, nightly seen, and drawn by bulls, unconquerable queen; Leader, Nymphe, nurse, on mountains wandering, hear the suppliants who with holy rites thy power revere, and to the herdsman with a favouring mind draw near.

Take the key and tap the top of the skull three times and repeat the following chant:

Hekate we ask that you open the gates of Hades
and allow our ancestors to traverse to us this night.

Guide our loved ones who have passed over,
to us with your wisdom and might.

Bring our ancestors of old and new
with you to share with us their gift of foresight.

Great Goddess we seek to commune with them
in the name of all that is light.

Bless us for we pay homage to you and
our departed ones in this very rite.

Commune with your ancestors and use your divination tools to see what the year has in store for you or ask any specific questions that you have.  Write them down with your pen and paper so you can reflect and refer to them later.

Thank and farewell your ancestors and Hekate.

Close sacred space or close the shrine.

Dispose the offerings by leaving them at a base of a tree, putting them in a compost, burying them in your garden or leaving them safely at a crossroads.

Donate your coins to a charity.


(C) T. Georgitsis 2010, Updated 2020

 

The Cardinal Points and Hekate

A Greek Wind Rose is a classical compass which was used in the Mediterranean by the Hellenics and Romans.  The Greek Wind Rose typically shows the points of orientation, directions and the names of the winds.  The Classical Wind Rose is the Greek Wind Rose as shown below:

Greek_12-wind_rose

The philosopher Aristotle in his Meteorology (c 340 BCE) created the 12 wind system which is seen below. 8 are principle winds: Aparctias (N), Caecias (NE), Apeliotes (E), Eurus (SE), Notos (S), Lips (SW), Zephyrus ( W ) and Argestes (NW) and two are half winds: Thrascias (NNW) and Meses (NNE).  Aristotle made an addition with the Phoenicias wind for the SSE but didn’t suggest any for the SSW.

Aristotle’s wind rose (correspondence to modern compass directions)

North (N) Aparctias (ἀπαρκτίας)
(variant Boreas (βoρέας))
the top meridian
North-Northeast (NNE) Meses (μέσης) the polar “rise”
Northeast (NE) Caecias (καικίας) the summer sunrise
East (E) Apeliotes (ἀπηλιώτης) the equinox sunrise
Southeast (SE) Eurus (εὖρος)
(variant Euronoti (εὐρόνοτοι))
the winter sunrise
South-Southeast (SSE) No wind
(except local Phoenicias (φοινικίας)
South (S) Notos (νότος) the bottom meridian.
South-Southwest (SSW) No wind
Southwest (SW) Lips (λίψ) the winter sunset
West ( W ) Zephyrus (ζέφυρος) the equinox sunset
Northwest (NW) Argestes (ἀργέστης)(Variants: Olympias(ὀλυμπίας),
Sciron (σκίρων)
the summer sunset.
North-Northwest (NNW) Thrascias (θρασκίας) the polar “set”

For those of you who like to work with Hellenic or Roman gods you can create sacred space similar to the wiccan circle cast using the Greek Wind Rose especially if you don’t have a shrine or temple space.  This is ideal for setting up temporary spaces whether they be in a private or public area as they can be established and disassembled at you own whim and need.  You can include the main cardinal points North – South – East or West or if so inclined, include all the other mid cardinal points such as North West etc.

When I was practicing wicca in the Elphame tradition the quarters had elemental witches who would call upon the elements allocated to North, South, East and West by using their wind names:

North and element of Earth: Boreas (βoρέας)

*South and element of Fire: Notos (νότος)

East and element of Air: Eurus (εὖρος)

West and element of Water: Zephyrus (ζέφυρος)

As someone who works with Hekate, I have found when casting circle in this fashion, instead of using elemental names, you can call in the quarters utilising the epithets of Hekate.  In this way you can use epithets which resonate with you and how you allocate meaning and connection to the elements.

I have shown an example below, please note your milage may vary.  The following is an example of a standard deosil (clockwise) elemental affiliation to some of Hekate’s epitaphs you could potentially use with your magick with Hekate.

Air: Hekate Angelos

Fire: Hekate Brimo

Earth:  Hekate Khthonia

Water: Hekate Einalian

For further information on Hekate’s epithets I would strongly recommend reading Sara Neheti Croft’s blog on Hekate’s Many Names

Regardless of which epithets you choose to help you call in the quarters with Hekate’s aid, my advice is get to know the epithets of Hekete you are working with first and foremost.  Develop a relationship with them and see if calling them in this aspect will work for you.  If not, move on as there is no use in working with a title or aspect of Hekate which simply doesn’t resonate with you.  If it works – great!  Further develop this connection and keep working with Her to deepen and strengthen it.

Magick isn’t stagnant and your practice doesn’t have to be either.  Your practice can evolve over time or it can also simplify over time.  Therefore the main tip I have for this kind of work is to practice, practice and practice!  Take note of what you are doing and do it with respect to Hekate and to yourself and be devoted as nothing of value has been gained without doing the work.


*in hindsight I feel this information shared by the HPS at the time was incorrect as the use of Apeliotes (ἀπηλιώτης) for South would have been more prudent to align with the correct Greek Wind Rose as Notos aligns with the South East.

(C) T. Georgitsis 2020

Hekate Magick: Re-Use and Re-Purpose

Hekate image shrine made from repurposed wood.

 

Before our modern throw-away culture – people rarely threw or tossed things away simply because they had outgrown their use or were broken and battered.  What they did was re-purpose, re-use or recycle – not only to save cost – but to reduce waste.  Some places and people still maintain this kind of living and now more than ever, as our world is being suffocated by waste cluttering our seas and landfills, it’s only environmentally conscious to do the same.

I like to challenge myself to learn to make my own devotional items, especially since I prefer to tailor things for my own spiritual and magickal needs/wants.  I find all you need is a can-do attitude, patience and practice – which is essential in developing your crafting skills.

Making your own magickal items for your workings can also ensure the ingredients you use are environmentally and ethically sourced. Also you dont have to spend a fortune for commercially manufactured items which can always be on the pricey side, as you can make things from recycled materials, so not only are you cutting cost but waste.

When my aunt and mother were creating their magickal crafts, there wasnt a local occult shop they could just pop into.  What they did is made do with what they could use from around the house and also what they could wild harvest in nature.  I am so glad to have had this influence in my early years because quite frankly its taught me to be self-sufficient.

I have a thing for not throwing anything out which I might re-use at a later date.  I have a cupboard filled with old jars, containers, paper bags and the like which can be reused or repurposed.  I continuously find they come in handy when making my own craft items.  I also like to repurpose and take something which once served one purpose and use it for another.

Hekate incense from repurposed jar and herbs.

 

13 Re-Use and Re-purpose Tips for the Hekate devotee:

  1. Wash and store old glass jars, bottles and containers as they can come in handy to store various items in them, such as oil blends, herbs, resins, incense, waters, powders etc. You can also use jars as soy candle holders and for jar spells and bottles as candle holders or vases.
  2. Used charcoal blocks for recipes such as black salt, it can also be gathered and placed in a charcoal burner as a heat buffer between the container and lit charcoal as well as using it for devotional artwork.
  3. Old pieces of wood can be used to make a shrine box, portable shrine, tools or divination box.
  4. Perishable offerings can be thrown into a compost for use over a garden and some items can be used to regrow the vegetable or plant it came from by harvesting seeds or planting the roots/tops.  I have done this successfully with many vegetables and herbs.
  5. Offerings in the form of flowers, herbs, salt and even fruit can be reused in the making of incense, water, powders etc. Drying out in a slow burning oven or herb air dryer after you’ve cut up your ingredients is a great way to reuse fruit peels for incense.  Also grinding up egg shells or using ground up coffee beans can be used in powders.
  6. Broken plates, glasses, old pins, rusty nails etc can be used for protection magick such as witches bottles.
  7. The stubs of candles can be used similar to sealing wax in various spells and workings.
  8. Use the bees wax from honey comb to make cosmetics, candles and furniture polish.
  9. Take that old piece of clothing, sheets, towels, tablecloth you love but can use anymore due to damage and wear and cut and and reuse material for crystal and divination bag holders, coverings for magic mirrors or tools and in some instances new altar or shrine cloths.
  10. Use old egg carton to plant seeds for herbs, plants and trees.
  11. Use broken crystals, rusty scissors, old keys and cracked statues in specific magick and ritual work.
  12. Feed the local birds and animals with safe food offerings from your shrine.
  13. Don’t throw out expired culinary herbs from your pantry, reuse them for spells, mojo bags, incense and the like.

Hekate mugwort candles made from repurposed beeswax and oil made from dried out herb.

 

I like to make my own version of Hekate Black salt repurposing spent charcoal and expired herbs using the following recipe which I would like to share which is easy to make:

Hekate’s *Black Salt  (© T. Georgitsis 2014)

Ingredients

  1. 2 parts kosher rock salt
  2. 1 part ash from the herbs of: dandelion, lavender, mint, bay, mugwort and rue (or any herb you associate with Hekate which is safe to burn and turn into ash)

Method

  1. In a heat proof dish and preferably outside take some dried dandelion root, lavender, mint, mugwort and rue herbs and burn with a lighter** until they are reduced to ash.  Whilst doing this visualise what kind of things you want to remove or banish out of your life.
  2. Take the ash and in a mortar, crush and blend it with a pestle with half the amount of salt to your ash ratio.
  3. Once blended use or store in an air tight container for later.

Simple Use for Black Salt

Sprinkle around the perimeter of your home.  With a long handled broom sweep the perimeter containing the traces of black salt outwards and away from your home.

*Not to be confused with the Indian spice black salt which is pink in colour.

** I prefer the long handled turbo gas lighters for the reach and ability to stay lit with wind

Hekate khernips from flowing water wildcrafted and stored in a re-purposed jar.

 

I strongly urge devotees to go and try and re-use and re-purpose items in Hekate’s name.  Also if anyone has any other ideas they would like to share with me I would love to hear them.


(C) T. Georgitsis  2014, Updated 2020

Hekate Magick:Working from Home

In Victoria, Australia we are currently in Stage 4 lockdown due to the pandemic, which means we can’t leave the house (unless your are an essential worker or its for medical, caretaking or limited exercise) and therefore those of us who can – are working from home.

Hekate is well known as a Goddess of the hearth and home and many of her devotees have shrines dedicated to her in their homes.  Therefore it is quite appropriate to venerate and honour her moreso whilst you are working from home.

Personally I have felt many more benefits when it comes to honouring the Gods and working with them in plain sight whilst I am working from home.  Some of the added benefits I have discovered include active practice whilst being productive during working hours.  To help those of you who would like to increase your practice whilst at home when it comes to Hekate (or any other God/dess) I have come up with 13 things you can do which I have listed below.

13 Things for Hekate whilst working from home:

  1. Burn incense.
  2. Burn aromatherapy oils.
  3. Perform a midday devotional.
  4. Eat more holistically, actively putting mindful vibrational energies into your food whilst preparing it and then eating it slowly, savouring each bite as a blessing.
  5. Listen to witchy music and podcasts out loud.
  6. Use any breaks for magic or spiritual work such as reading a chapter from a Hekate book you have been wanting to read or giving yourself a quick reading or healing.
  7. Your working desk can be covered in crystals, tarot cards, Goddess statues, bones etc – things which resonate with the energies and remind you of Hekate.
  8. You can surround yourself with Hekate centric art which you can focus on when you need to give your eyes a break from computer work to prevent eye strain.
  9. Journaling or note taking for deeper development at a later time.  If something comes to you such as an idea for a devotional act in Hekate’s name such as a spell, chant, hymn, ritual or some volunteering or support work which can be done from home you have the freedom to pause and focus on that.
  10. Hekate’s gardening during breaks – use your breaks to maintain, admire or surround yourself with your herbs, flowers or trees.  You can also use this time to start to plant a Hekate garden which can be something as small as a herb on a windowsill.
  11. You can make herbal teas or juices in honour of Hekate to sip on whilst you work.
  12. Sing, chant, dance and sway as a way to move your body when you need to get up to prevent RSI, back-pain or workplace fatigue.
  13. If you havent done it already a Hekate shrine can be set up near or on your workspace or you can maintain the one you currently have.

I am sure there are other things you can do to honour Hekate whilst working from home, which doest take away from the work you need to complete, which can create a deeper connection to her and her devotion.  So my advice is – use this time wisely and don’t waste the opportunity.

With the above said, you can also simply chose to do nothing of the above except contemplate or think upon the nature of Hekate and how you feel about her or her role in your life and in the world generally.

Whatever you choose to do during this time be kind and gentle to yourself and those around you. This is a unique time for us, which is full of emotions and stress and which should be taken care of, instead of projected in unhealthy ways (whether it be towards yourself or others).


(C) T. Georgitsis  2020