Hekate for Halloween

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Halloween is also celebrated as the witches new year and is the time when the veil between the worlds is at its thinnest and therefore perfect for divination or contacting the dead.  Hekate’s connection to witches can be traced back to classical Greece where they worked with her for various incantations, spells and called upon her for assistance and blessings.

Hekate, the virgin titaness who prefers solitude, goddess of the sea, earth and sky, light bearer and revealer to those who seek, keeper of the crossroads who roams the cemeteries for lost souls, queen of magic and the night, key bearer who has access to the otherworld and can commune with those who have passed between the veils, goddess of ghosts and necromancy, patron of travellers who guides them to their destination.

Goddess of witchcraft, magic and ghosts – Hekate in my opinion exudes the energy of Halloween. During Halloween Hekate, the embodiment of death roams the earth and is therefore one of the most suitable gods to honour during this time.  Since Hekate is known as goddess of the dead, mistress of souls who can accompany the departed between the realm of the living and that of the dead, witches have naturally been drawn to call upon her during the festival of the dead: Halloween also known as Samhain.  Hekate can be called upon as an intermediary to connect you to your ancestors especially since our dearly departed tend to visit us during Halloween.  Also communing with the ancestors during this time can reveal future fate and Hekate can also be of assistance when divining.

Venerating the ancestors and Hekate during this time which also celebrates the last harvest ensures blessings and that fertility to the land is returned in spring.  The ancient Greeks would often leave offerings to Hekate in order for their crops not to fail and for her storm aspect to be pacified.  Considering winter is a time of storms and the earth lays dormant, getting Hekate on your good side with respects to these aspects is forward thinking.

I personally see that during Mabon (Autumn Equinox) is when Hekate, torches in hand, guides and protects Persephone as she descends into the underworld.  At Halloween, Hekate has returned from the Underworld with news from the dead, as she is one of the few gods who can traverse between all the worlds.

Constructing a dumb supper for Hekate and your ancestors is a wonderful way to honour them both by placing a plate of food that Hekate and your ancestors would appreciate then leaving it on a Hekate or ancestor altar, on a crossroads or on your doorsteps ensures they will take on the essence of the food offered.

Offerings to your ancestors can include food they enjoyed during life and offerings to Hekate that compliments Halloween includes apples, pomegranates, garlic, onion, wine, mead and mugwort tea.

Here is a simple ritual for Hekate, Halloween and your ancestors I have composed and used successfully in the past:

Prepare a dumb supper and place in the NW of your circle or on the left of your altar.

Create sacred space.

Light some incense preferably dragons blood, frankincense or livani (which is found at Greek continental shops and I prefer the rose scented type).

Have a candle placed in the middle of your altar before an image of Hekate in red or black so your deceased loved ones can make their way to you whilst invoking a hymn to Hekate (I prefer the Orphic Hymn to Hekate).

Have a key (I prefer skeleton keys) and an image of a skull (I prefer to use crystal) on the left side of your alter.

Any forms of divination should be placed on your shrine which include, tarot cards, scrying bowl or mirror.

Begin the rite by lighting the spirit candle and evoke Hekate with the following Orphic hymn:

“Hekate Einodia, Trioditis, lovely dame, of earthly, watery, and celestial frame, sepulchral, in a saffron veil arrayed, pleased with dark ghosts that wander through the shade; Perseis, solitary goddess, hail! The world’s key-bearer, never doomed to fail; in stags rejoicing, huntress, nightly seen, and drawn by bulls, unconquerable queen; Leader, Nymphe, nurse, on mountains wandering, hear the suppliants who with holy rites thy power revere, and to the herdsman with a favouring mind draw near.”

 

Take the key and tap the top of the skull three times and repeat the following chant:

“Hekate we ask that you open the gates of Hades and allow our ancestors to traverse to us this night

Guide our loved ones who have passed over, to us with your wisdom and might

Bring our ancestors of old and new with you to share with us their gift of foresight

Great Goddess we seek to commune with them in the name of all that is light

Bless us for we pay homage to you and our departed ones in this very rite”

 

Commune with your ancestors and use your divination tools to see what the year has in store for you or ask any specific questions that you have.

Thank and farewell your ancestors and Hekate.

Close sacred space.

(C) T. Georgitsis 2010

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First and Last: A Devotional For Hestia

I have a hymn dedicated to Hestia in a new book released in her name!

Terence P Ward congrats on editing this great devotional.

To purchase your copy go here:

First and The Last: A Devotional For Hestia

 

Daughter of the Sun Review: Pagan Collective of Victoria

Just received a positive review for the Sekhmet devotional I edited:

Published in Spokes of the Wheel,  The Official Newsletter of the Pagan Collective of Victoria,  Yule 2016 Volume 3, Issue 4

“Daughter of the Sun, A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Sekhmet”

It’s a strange experience discovering a God or Goddess that is unfamiliar to you for the first time.

You may have come across them in a classical painting, a reference in a poem or a book on mythology it catches your imagination or has a spark of recognition. It encourage to find out more and search through obscure references books looking for the earliest of references and may even push you further explore the culture or history of the people that originally worshiped your new God.

And that’s why it’s been such a pleasure to review Daughter of the Sun – A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Sekhmet. Sekhmet is a Goddess I really knew very little about. The joy of this anthology is the diverse views and perspectives on the Goddess that that paints a such a vivid picture.

T. Georgitsis has done a stellar effort here as editor of this anthology consisting of such a diverse range of material this book is full of exciting stories, beautiful poetry and wonderful art.We are introduced to Sekhmet; A Goddess of the ancient Egypt pantheon. Sekhmet is a Goddess of many facets: Avatar of justice, warrior, healer, hunter and mother. You’ll will learn so much about the character of this Goddess throughout this anthology

This book is filled with poetic inspiration and vividly paints a picture of Sekmet very much alive and radiating with power thousands of years later after the fall of Ancient Egypt.

I thoroughly recommend you get copy Daughter of the Sun if you are familiar with Sekhmet you will find it an invaluable resource. If you are just learning about this Goddess for the first time like I am, it is a wonderful introduction.

Ryan, Co-Founder of the Pagan Collective of Victoria

Hathor Devotional Call Out!

I will be editing an upcoming devotional in honor of Hathor.
See below for further details of submission guidelines:

The Lady of the Sycamore:
A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Hathor

Bibliotheca Alexandrina is seeking submissions for Lady of the Sycamore: A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Hathor. This anthology opens for submissions on 1st November 2016 and closes on 1st June 2017, with a projected release date of August 2017.
 
Suggestions for possible contributions include, but are not limited to: prayers, heka, poetry, hymns, rituals, essays, short fiction, recipes, music, and artwork.
 
Those interested in contributing to this anthology are encouraged to explore the various titles and myths of this goddess, such as: Hathor as Goddess of Love; The Great One of Many Names; Lady of Stars; Mistress of the West; Lady of the Sycamore; Mistress of the Necropolis; Lady of the Turquoise; Lady of Malachite; Mistress of Music; Queen of the Harp Playing; Mistress of Jubilation; Queen of the Dance; Mistress of Inebriety Without End; Queen of Wreath Weaving; Mistress of Heaven; Celestial Nurse; Mother of Mothers; Hand of God; Lady of the Vulva; the Seven Hathors; and the Eye of Ra;
 
Hathor’s cults in Dendera, Philae, Timna and Luxor;
 
Hathor’s connections to and her relationships with other Deities, such as Horus the Elder, Ra, Aset/Isis, Sopdet, Nebethetepet, Nehebkau, Bat, Neith, Khnum, the Four Sons of Horus, Nut, Mut, Sobek, and Bast; 
 
Hathor’s Connection to the Menat and Sistrum, and her various symbols of power;
 
the role/s and power of Hathor’s Priests and Magicians in ancient Egypt and today;
 
Hathor’s connection to Ancient Egyptian Royalty;
the areas of influence and expertise over which this goddess holds domain, and their place in the ancient and modern world, e.g. fertility and motherhood, love, beauty, ecstasy, music, drunkenness, luxury, foreignness, the sun, cows and milk, divine wrath, hairdressing, et cetera; 
 
analysis of her place in The Book of the Celestial Cow and The Conflict of Horus and Seth;
compare/contrast Hathor and Deities in other pantheons (or who were adopted into the Egyptian pantheon), such as Aphrodite, Astarte, Dionysus, Freyja, and Venus;
 
and the nature of her worship and adoration in Ancient Egypt and among today’s practitioners and devotees.
 
All works submitted must be original, not plagiarized or public domain. Academic articles must provide proper citation for all sources used. Previously published submissions are acceptable, as long as the author retains all rights. The author will continue to retain all rights to any submissions accepted for this anthology. Upon acceptance, the author must complete the permission to publish form, including a brief author biography to be included in the anthology.
 
The editor reserves the right to make editorial changes to the spelling, grammar, and formatting of submission where appropriate. The editor may also ask the contributor to make modifications to the submission/s. The editor may reject submissions, as necessary. Contributors will be sent a preview .pdf of the manuscript, and will have one week to send any suggested corrections to the editor.
 
No monetary compensation will be provided, as proceeds from all sales will be divided between charitable donations in honor of the Deities and production costs for future publications from Bibliotheca Alexandrina. All contributors will receive a free .pdf of the final manuscript for personal use (not to be distributed) and a coupon code which will allow them to purchase three physical copies of the anthology at cost (plus shipping).
 
Send all submissions and queries to Tina Georgitsis at: tarotwithtina@yahoo.com.au
 
Acceptable length is 100-10,000 words (with the exception of poetry). All artwork must be at least 300dpi.

With Lyre and Bow: A Devotional in Honor of Apollo

A new anthology dedicated to Apollo is here!

I have personally contributed some recipes to this devotional and its available for purchase right now through the Bibliotheca Alexandrina website on Createspace and will be available later on through Amazon and Barnes and Noble:

With Lyre and Bow: A Devotional in Honor of Apollo

 

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Knowing Hekate: A coloring book by Sara Croft

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This is the one of the best spiritual/magickal coloring books I have come across and I highly recommend it. The artist shares with us her talent of capturing Hekate’s spirit whilst allowing us to fill in what colors we resonate with, thus allowing us to give our own flavor to her image. I have always wanted to find a coloring book which I connected with and spread a little magick my way whilst honoring a Goddess I very much respect. Like the title suggests its dedicated to Hekate with some incredible images for you to color. These images are accompanied with concise information about Hekate which creates a wonderful devotional aspect to the book and teaches you about Hekate whilst you color. Combining creative with informative, this is a great coloring book for a novice or master and I would recommend it for all devotees as well as those who have no knowledge of this limitless Goddess. I loved this book so much I ended up getting copies not only my nieces, nephews and godchildren but also gifts for my friends whom loved the whole vibe of the book.

Daughter of the Sun Review: Linda Iles

An amazing review of the Sekhmet devotional I edited by Linda Iles:

“Daughter of the Sun, A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Sekhmet”

Sekhmet was certainly one of the most important Goddessess in ancient Egypt, and although She continues to enjoy wide popularity today, this ancient and beautiful Goddess is probably One of the most misinterpreted and misunderstood.

This anthology offers a wide variety of contributions, but, unlike some of the other publications of this type, “Daughter of the Sun” goes beyond the scope normally offered through such a work. There is a whole section titled “Rites and Recipes” filled with excellent materials for private and public devotions. Another section, “Myths and Musings” seamlessly blends history, myth and experiences of the modern practitioner. Through all of the beautifully entries in this book, the reader is brought into the living presence of this ancient and beloved Goddess Who lives in the hearts of so many in the present day.

“Daughter of the Sun” contains within its pages a depth and wealth of material that will prove valuable to both the seasoned devotee and new votary alike. It will certainly introduce source materials that many readers would not discover or have access to on their own. At the same time, the pieces within this anthology offer perspectives on the more well known materials in new and exciting ways.

This is a beautiful study, an offering from the heart to one of the most beloved Goddesses of ancient Egypt. Her vibrancy shines through on every page, and will certainly touch the heart of every one who reads it. This work truly is of a caliber that Sekhmet deserves, worthy of being savored, page-by-page; read and re-read, time and time again. It is one of the best offerings dedicated to one particular Deity that I have ever read.

Linda Iles Author, “Bast, Cat Goddess of Ancient Egypt”

Book Inspired Incense: Fire of Azrael

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Re-read Dion Fortune’s “Sea Priestess” and was inspired to create an incense blend.

In the book a fire is built containing the wood of Juniper, Cedar and Sandalwood and as the fire tempers, the lit up ashes are used to bring on visions.

This fire is called the Fire of Azrael and is used for scrying.

You can do the same with ground up equal parts of juniper, cedar and sandlewood and use it as incense.  Inhale the fumes when you throw a pinch or two onto a burning chacoal block and utilize the smoke to scry.

(c) T. Georgitsis 2015 – image used with permission

 

Daughter of the Sun hard copies arrive!

The hard copies of “Daughter of the Sun: A Devotional in Honor of Sekhmet” – the book I edited and contributed to was delivered to me in Australia last night 😀

Even though I have read it multiple times, its very cool to see it in a hard copy version!

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Daughter of the Sun: A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Sekhmet (edited by me)

Its here! The Sekhmet book I edited is available right now: http://goo.gl/gi6Wu4

A huge thank you to all the contributors for all your submissions and Rebecca Buchanan for the assistance. This has been a labor of love for over a year and I am so happy this anthology has come to fruition!

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