Hekate Magick: Re-Use and Re-Purpose

Hekate image shrine made from repurposed wood.

 

Before our modern throw-away culture – people rarely threw or tossed things away simply because they had outgrown their use or were broken and battered.  What they did was re-purpose, re-use or recycle – not only to save cost – but to reduce waste.  Some places and people still maintain this kind of living and now more than ever, as our world is being suffocated by waste cluttering our seas and landfills, it’s only environmentally conscious to do the same.

I like to challenge myself to learn to make my own devotional items, especially since I prefer to tailor things for my own spiritual and magickal needs/wants.  I find all you need is a can-do attitude, patience and practice – which is essential in developing your crafting skills.

Making your own magickal items for your workings can also ensure the ingredients you use are environmentally and ethically sourced. Also you dont have to spend a fortune for commercially manufactured items which can always be on the pricey side, as you can make things from recycled materials, so not only are you cutting cost but waste.

When my aunt and mother were creating their magickal crafts, there wasnt a local occult shop they could just pop into.  What they did is made do with what they could use from around the house and also what they could wild harvest in nature.  I am so glad to have had this influence in my early years because quite frankly its taught me to be self-sufficient.

I have a thing for not throwing anything out which I might re-use at a later date.  I have a cupboard filled with old jars, containers, paper bags and the like which can be reused or repurposed.  I continuously find they come in handy when making my own craft items.  I also like to repurpose and take something which once served one purpose and use it for another.

Hekate incense from repurposed jar and herbs.

 

13 Re-Use and Re-purpose Tips for the Hekate devotee:

  1. Wash and store old glass jars, bottles and containers as they can come in handy to store various items in them, such as oil blends, herbs, resins, incense, waters, powders etc. You can also use jars as soy candle holders and for jar spells and bottles as candle holders or vases.
  2. Used charcoal blocks for recipes such as black salt, it can also be gathered and placed in a charcoal burner as a heat buffer between the container and lit charcoal as well as using it for devotional artwork.
  3. Old pieces of wood can be used to make a shrine box, portable shrine, tools or divination box.
  4. Perishable offerings can be thrown into a compost for use over a garden and some items can be used to regrow the vegetable or plant it came from by harvesting seeds or planting the roots/tops.  I have done this successfully with many vegetables and herbs.
  5. Offerings in the form of flowers, herbs, salt and even fruit can be reused in the making of incense, water, powders etc. Drying out in a slow burning oven or herb air dryer after you’ve cut up your ingredients is a great way to reuse fruit peels for incense.  Also grinding up egg shells or using ground up coffee beans can be used in powders.
  6. Broken plates, glasses, old pins, rusty nails etc can be used for protection magick such as witches bottles.
  7. The stubs of candles can be used similar to sealing wax in various spells and workings.
  8. Use the bees wax from honey comb to make cosmetics, candles and furniture polish.
  9. Take that old piece of clothing, sheets, towels, tablecloth you love but can use anymore due to damage and wear and cut and and reuse material for crystal and divination bag holders, coverings for magic mirrors or tools and in some instances new altar or shrine cloths.
  10. Use old egg carton to plant seeds for herbs, plants and trees.
  11. Use broken crystals, rusty scissors, old keys and cracked statues in specific magick and ritual work.
  12. Feed the local birds and animals with safe food offerings from your shrine.
  13. Don’t throw out expired culinary herbs from your pantry, reuse them for spells, mojo bags, incense and the like.

Hekate mugwort candles made from repurposed beeswax and oil made from dried out herb.

 

I like to make my own version of Hekate Black salt repurposing spent charcoal and expired herbs using the following recipe which I would like to share which is easy to make:

Hekate’s *Black Salt  (© T. Georgitsis 2014)

Ingredients

  1. 2 parts kosher rock salt
  2. 1 part ash from the herbs of: dandelion, lavender, mint, bay, mugwort and rue (or any herb you associate with Hekate which is safe to burn and turn into ash)

Method

  1. In a heat proof dish and preferably outside take some dried dandelion root, lavender, mint, mugwort and rue herbs and burn with a lighter** until they are reduced to ash.  Whilst doing this visualise what kind of things you want to remove or banish out of your life.
  2. Take the ash and in a mortar, crush and blend it with a pestle with half the amount of salt to your ash ratio.
  3. Once blended use or store in an air tight container for later.

Simple Use for Black Salt

Sprinkle around the perimeter of your home.  With a long handled broom sweep the perimeter containing the traces of black salt outwards and away from your home.

*Not to be confused with the Indian spice black salt which is pink in colour.

** I prefer the long handled turbo gas lighters for the reach and ability to stay lit with wind

Hekate khernips from flowing water wildcrafted and stored in a re-purposed jar.

 

I strongly urge devotees to go and try and re-use and re-purpose items in Hekate’s name.  Also if anyone has any other ideas they would like to share with me I would love to hear them.


(C) T. Georgitsis  2014, Updated 2020

Hekate Magick:Working from Home

In Victoria, Australia we are currently in Stage 4 lockdown due to the pandemic, which means we can’t leave the house (unless your are an essential worker or its for medical, caretaking or limited exercise) and therefore those of us who can – are working from home.

Hekate is well known as a Goddess of the hearth and home and many of her devotees have shrines dedicated to her in their homes.  Therefore it is quite appropriate to venerate and honour her moreso whilst you are working from home.

Personally I have felt many more benefits when it comes to honouring the Gods and working with them in plain sight whilst I am working from home.  Some of the added benefits I have discovered include active practice whilst being productive during working hours.  To help those of you who would like to increase your practice whilst at home when it comes to Hekate (or any other God/dess) I have come up with 13 things you can do which I have listed below.

13 Things for Hekate whilst working from home:

  1. Burn incense.
  2. Burn aromatherapy oils.
  3. Perform a midday devotional.
  4. Eat more holistically, actively putting mindful vibrational energies into your food whilst preparing it and then eating it slowly, savouring each bite as a blessing.
  5. Listen to witchy music and podcasts out loud.
  6. Use any breaks for magic or spiritual work such as reading a chapter from a Hekate book you have been wanting to read or giving yourself a quick reading or healing.
  7. Your working desk can be covered in crystals, tarot cards, Goddess statues, bones etc – things which resonate with the energies and remind you of Hekate.
  8. You can surround yourself with Hekate centric art which you can focus on when you need to give your eyes a break from computer work to prevent eye strain.
  9. Journaling or note taking for deeper development at a later time.  If something comes to you such as an idea for a devotional act in Hekate’s name such as a spell, chant, hymn, ritual or some volunteering or support work which can be done from home you have the freedom to pause and focus on that.
  10. Hekate’s gardening during breaks – use your breaks to maintain, admire or surround yourself with your herbs, flowers or trees.  You can also use this time to start to plant a Hekate garden which can be something as small as a herb on a windowsill.
  11. You can make herbal teas or juices in honour of Hekate to sip on whilst you work.
  12. Sing, chant, dance and sway as a way to move your body when you need to get up to prevent RSI, back-pain or workplace fatigue.
  13. If you havent done it already a Hekate shrine can be set up near or on your workspace or you can maintain the one you currently have.

I am sure there are other things you can do to honour Hekate whilst working from home, which doest take away from the work you need to complete, which can create a deeper connection to her and her devotion.  So my advice is – use this time wisely and don’t waste the opportunity.

With the above said, you can also simply chose to do nothing of the above except contemplate or think upon the nature of Hekate and how you feel about her or her role in your life and in the world generally.

Whatever you choose to do during this time be kind and gentle to yourself and those around you. This is a unique time for us, which is full of emotions and stress and which should be taken care of, instead of projected in unhealthy ways (whether it be towards yourself or others).


(C) T. Georgitsis  2020

Hekate Magick: Four Thieves Vinegar

Four Thieves Vinegar also known as Prophylactic Vinegar or Marseilles Vinegar/Remedy, is a health tonic made from vinegar, herbs, spices and garlic which was created in the middle ages to protect against the plague (black death).  Similar concoctions have been made as far back as the time of Hippocrates in Ancient Greece.

The basic recipe for the remedy is adding certain herbs to be placed and steeped in a vinegar solution for several days.

In the current climate of Corvid-19 it can be used as powerful disinfectant.  

I created an original recipe several years ago.  This recipe is based on a medieval recipe and has modern ingredients added which I personally found useful:

Setjataset’s Four Thieves Vinegar Recipe (© T. Georgitsis 2014)

Ingredients

  • Vinegar (rice wine or apple cider) – 2 litres
  • Wormwood (1 tablespoon)
  • Sage (1 tablespoon)
  • Marjoram (1 tablespoon)
  • Meadowsweet (1 tablespoon)
  • Campala Root (3 tablespoons)
  • Angelic Root (3 tablespoons)
  • Rosemary (3 tablespoons)
  • Horehound(3 tablespoons)
  • Champhor (3 tablespoons)
  • Thyme (2 tablespoons) – modern addition
  • Mint (2 tablespoons) – modern addition 
  • Lavender (2 tablespoons)
  • Cloves (25 cloves)
  • Rue (3 tablespoons) – optional
  • Garlic (3 cloves) – optional

Method

  1. Add dried herbs to vinegar solution.
  2. Before closing the lid put some cling wrap to stop metal lid from corroding.
  3. Steep for 3 weeks in a secure glass jar, in a cool dark place.
  4. Strain solution through cheesecloth and then bottle securely in smaller jars.

Simple Use for Four Thieves Vinegar

Use as a disinfectant or house cleaning agent.

Cautions
DO NOT TAKE INTERNALLY!
DO NOT USE IF PREGNANT OR LACTATING!
DO NOT USE/TAKE IF YOU HAVE ALLERGIES TO INGREDIENTS MENTIONED!

 

Recently I created an amended version of my Four Thieves Vinegar in dedication to Hekate which I made in conjunction with a prayer for plague protection I wrote in honour of her.

My suggestion is to repeat the prayer before you start making the vinegar, after you have created the vinegar and left it to steep and once again after you have decanted the final product, once it has been strained.

Here is my recipe for the Hekate’s Four Thieves Vinegar:

Setjataset’s Hekate Four Thieves Vinegar (© T. Georgitsis 2020)

  • Vinegar (apple cider) – 1 litre
  • Wormwood (1 tablespoon)
  • Sage (1 tablespoon)
  • Rosemary (2 tablespoons)
  • Thyme (2 tablespoons)
  • Mint (2 tablespoons)
  • Lavender (2 tablespoons) – culinary not aromatic
  • Cloves (5 cloves)
  • Garlic (3 bulbs) – optional
  • Bay Leaves (1 leaf) – optional

Method

  1. Add fresh herbs to a jar.
  2. Cover herbs with vinegar solution.
  3. Before closing the lid put some cling wrap to stop metal lid from corroding.
  4. Steep for 3 weeks in a secure glass jar in a cool dark place.
  5. Strain solution through cheesecloth and then bottle securely in smaller jars.

Simple Use for Hekate Four Thieves Vinegar 

  1. 1 teaspoon diluted in a room temperature glass of water to be drunk once a week.
  2. 1 tablespoon in a bath once a week.
  3. 1 tablespoon in a small spray bottle to use on surfaces as required/daily.

Cautions
DO NOT TAKE IF PREGNANT OR LACTATING!
DO NOT USE/TAKE IF YOU HAVE ALLERGIES TO INGREDIENTS MENTIONED!

Here is the prayer I wrote for Hekate to go with the creation of her vinegar:

Hekate Prayer for Plague Protection (© T. Georgitsis 2020)

Hekate Alexeatis

I call to you as Averter of Evil

Keep this virus away from me (and my loved ones)

Hekate Aregos

I call to you as Helper

Help me (and my loved ones) to keep safe from this pandemic

Hekate Episkopos

I call to you as Guardian

Guard me (and my loved ones) against Corona-18

Hekate Ekdotis

I call to you as Bestower

Bring to me (and my loved ones) health and vitality 

Hekate Propolos

I call to you as Guide

Assist me (and my loved ones) during this difficult time

Hekate Soteira

I call to you as Saviour

Be there for me (and my loved ones) 


 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2014, Updated 2020

Hekate Magick: Khernips (Sacred Water)

Circe by John William Waterhouse

 

Khernips which is also known as lustral water is blessed or sacred water which is employed in Hellenic rites and can be used in the devotional workings of Hekate.

Khernips is primarily used for libations, offerings and to purge oneself of miasma (environmental and energetic pollutants believed to cause illness by the Ancient Greeks and modern Hellenes).  It can also be used to heal body/mind/spirit/emotion and can be consumed for internal use or applied externally (depending on the properties).

Khernips can be employed to bless or consecrate anything from shrine/altar tools, jewellery and places of practice, to plants, people and pets.  Washing one’s hands with blessed water before entering into ritual was common practice for the Ancient Greeks as it was believed to keep miasma at bay.  Khernips can be also used to put out a ritual fire, to wash ritual clothing and for use in practical and ceremonial magic, such as where one creates objects for specific purposes like a talisman from clay and water.

The Ancient Greeks made their khernips simply by collecting it from a sacred spring or well and storing it in a jug or similar vessel for devotional use.  The same technique can be employed now, however if you are collecting from a spring, be sure to leave an appropriate offerings like coins, flowers or herbs.

Another way to make this sanctified water is as easy as colleting rain water and purifying it.  My favourite technique of making khernips is collecting sea water. This can be ritualistically done by placing the vessel just on the shore line and collecting the water through a wave as it comes towards you. Several other methods of khernips I have successfully used over the years includes: mixing kosher rock salt and purified water, herbal/flower water (orange blossom, lavender, rose and angelica for Hekate), aromatherapy water utilising cold pressed essential oil and another method is purified water mixed with wine (sweet pine wine or any robust wine).

The way you can use khernips is by placing it in a glass lidded container for storage and then pouring it into a bowl or jug for ritual use.  You can then dip your hands into the bowl or alternatively pour the khernips over your hands from a jug to purify yourself before rites.  Use a bundle of tied up herbs to asperge* with or alternatively use your hands to sprinkle it over things like offerings, tools and sacred space.  Also putting khernips in a spray bottle to be able to diffuse it within an area works very well, as does using a water bottle or a bottle with a dripper. Some khernips, especially those having plant materials, need to be refrigerated or alternatively a preservative needs to be added such as a dash of wheat germ oil, olive oil or pure alcohol to keep it from going rancid.

This is a simple khernips creation and blessing I created as part of my regular devotional use for Hekate which I would like to share:

Setjataset’s Khernips Blessing ((C)T. Georgitsis 2013)

Ingredients:

  • Dried Bay Leaf
  • Purified Water (filtered water)

Method:

Light the end of a dried bay laurel leaf and say:

I banish all that is unclean, corrupt and profane with the aid of Hekate!

Plunge the lit end into the water and say:

It is purified, upright and sanctified in Hekate’s name.

You can employ the same method by holding some rock salt over a bowl of water, sprinkling the rock salt over the water and finishing off by swivelling around the mixture in the bowl with both hands.

Suggested Use for Khernips:

    1. To purify yourself before and after ritual.
    2. To remove miasma* from people, animals, physical items or spaces.
    3. To be used for libations in ritual and magickal workings.
    4. To be used as offerings.
    5. To water sacred plants, herbs and trees.

*Asperge = to sprinkle with sacred water.

(C) T. Georgitsis 2014, Updated 2020

The Australian Pagan Magazine (Issue 4): Regular Hekate Column – Khernips/Sacred Water

In my next regular Hekate column in Issue 4 of The Australian Pagan Magazine I discuss khernips/blessed water and how to make it.

Just a few weeks away till the release Issue 4 of The Australian Pagan Magazine. You can get in early and pre order through Alpine Nirvana, and receive a free silk pouch! Only for pre orders, and only through Alpine Nirvana.

http://alpinenirvana.wix.com/alpine-nirvana#!product/prd1/1346245281/the-australian-pagan-magazine-issue-4-pre-order