Axis Mundi: Ancient Egyptian Aromatherapy

I have an article about Ancient Egyptian “Aromatherapy” in this issue called Fragrance of the Gods – check it out, its free!

Axis Mundi Autumn Issue 2017

 

Isis-Seshat 2017 Spring Issue: Kemetic Medicine

The latest issue of Isis Seshat (the magazine for the Fellowship of Isis and the like) has just come out and I have an article on Kemetic Medicine.

This special issue commemorates the 41st anniversary of the Fellowship of Isis, the centennial anniversary of Lady Olivia Robertson’s birth, and celebrates our relationships with Holy Powers in Holy Places. $5 a copy payments via PayPal at anna.applegate@yahoo.com.

Initiation Hymn

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This is the hymn I had to write for my first degree back when I was part of the Elphame tradition in the 1990’s.

I came across it recently in my handwritten BOS.

Please excuse the “old English” style language as I was in my early 20’s and was over exposed to that liturgy technique during inner and outer court.  The AHP and HP at the time used and wrote rituals in this tone and truth be told I personally don’t use this type of language and never have.

Interesting to see how much I have changed yet my devotion is still unwavering over the years.

Initiation Hymn

O Great Goddess of all that is,
I call upon you to be here with me now.
Come to me O Great Lady as I invoke you in your many guises.
I call thee forth for guidance as I walk the old path and strive for spiritual growth and knowledge.

To Athtor I call out, Mother Night.
Bring to me respect of all things,
Power within and heighten my hidden senses.

To Bast I call out, Playful Lady.
Bring to me happiness and all that is joyful in one’s life
and help me to live the life to its fullest.

To Hathor I call out, O Beauteous One.
Bring to me love for all things
and the power of self-love.

To Maat I call out, Bearer of Truth.
Bring to me truth, honour, justice and
the power to speak out against untruths.

To Mert I call out, Lover of Silence.
Bring to me the wisdom of silence
and constraint when needed.

To Isis I call out, Mistress of Charms and Enchantments.
Bring to me the determination and dedication
in finding and learning the mysteries.

© T. Georgitsis 1998

Purification in Kemet

Purification was an important aspect of the daily life of the Ancient Egyptians. It kept Isfet (evil) away which took the form of demons, pestilence and disease – which would run rife without adequate purification practices.   Purification was seen as a way to strengthen the power of protection as well as provide insight through making the way clear and clean.

The Ancient Egyptians would use fumigation as part of the purification process which involved incense made from resins and herbs which would be lit and wafted through temple, royal and residential homes alike.  The Ancient Egyptian clergy and aristocracy would shave their bodies as a way to keep themselves pure and free from pollutants.  The Priests would also keep themselves pure by avoiding dressing in garments made from animals such as wool or leather and only wear natural materials like linen. Another method the priests had for remaining pure was to abstain from specific foods, depending on which God they served.

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Priests had to abstain from any sexual intercourse before rituals as a form of purification even though they normally lived like the rest of the population and married and had children.  The only difference is that they dedicated some time out of the year to honor their gods in their part time vocations as priests of the temple.  Therefore before they re-entered the temple they would abstain from intimate relations to be pure for their gods.

The priests and royalty had lakes they had deemed for divine purification.  There they would ritually bathe themselves with natron, a salt like substance collected from the banks of the Nile river, before entering their temples to perform their religious rites.  Natron was used by the Ancient Egyptians for mummification but the priests also used it for personal purification in which they would wash their mouth out, hands and feet when it was dissolved in water.

Purification of the temple shrine and the associated tools was completed using natron so it was a cleaning agent which was pretty much used for everything.    Natron infused water was used to wash the temple walls and floors and implements as well as the images of the gods.  Images of the gods within the temple sanctuary were sprinkled with water and grains of natron during various times of the day and night when opening, maintaining and closing the shrine occurred.  Any remaining natron water was used to wash the surrounding streets and buildings.

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For practicing Kemetics using abstinence, fumigation, cleaning and bathing still occurs as part of the purification practice today. Since natron was a natural occurrence found on the banks of the Nile and we don’t have the luxury of being able to collect it this way I would like to share with you how to make your own natron.

Two methods I have found to make natron successfully :

  1. Simply mix some baking soda and kosher salt in the blender or in a mortar with a pestle – ¼ part baking soda to ¾ part salt. 
  2. Bake method outlined below which I prefer due to the consistency and its potency:

a. Mix one cup kosher salt and one cup baking soda and place in a cooking pot (shouldn’t be more than ¼ of the depth of the pot).

b. Add water until it covers the mixture and heat on low whilst constantly stirring.

c. Once it reaches boiling point ensure all the ingredients blend smoothly and take off heat.

d. Mixture should be slime like substance which you can now pour and spread over a baking paper lined oven tray.

e. You can put it in direct sunlight to dry out covered by netting so it isn’t polluted by grit or bugs (this can take a month or so) or alternatively place in a very low oven for several hours until the mixture dries out ensuring the mixture doesn’t turn brown as it must remain white in color.

f. Once dry, break apart the sheets of natron into smaller barley sized pieces and store in air tight container so it doesn’t get damp and clump up.

(c) T. Georgitsis 2014

Daughter of the Sun Review: Pagan Collective of Victoria

Just received a positive review for the Sekhmet devotional I edited:

Published in Spokes of the Wheel,  The Official Newsletter of the Pagan Collective of Victoria,  Yule 2016 Volume 3, Issue 4

“Daughter of the Sun, A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Sekhmet”

It’s a strange experience discovering a God or Goddess that is unfamiliar to you for the first time.

You may have come across them in a classical painting, a reference in a poem or a book on mythology it catches your imagination or has a spark of recognition. It encourage to find out more and search through obscure references books looking for the earliest of references and may even push you further explore the culture or history of the people that originally worshiped your new God.

And that’s why it’s been such a pleasure to review Daughter of the Sun – A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Sekhmet. Sekhmet is a Goddess I really knew very little about. The joy of this anthology is the diverse views and perspectives on the Goddess that that paints a such a vivid picture.

T. Georgitsis has done a stellar effort here as editor of this anthology consisting of such a diverse range of material this book is full of exciting stories, beautiful poetry and wonderful art.We are introduced to Sekhmet; A Goddess of the ancient Egypt pantheon. Sekhmet is a Goddess of many facets: Avatar of justice, warrior, healer, hunter and mother. You’ll will learn so much about the character of this Goddess throughout this anthology

This book is filled with poetic inspiration and vividly paints a picture of Sekmet very much alive and radiating with power thousands of years later after the fall of Ancient Egypt.

I thoroughly recommend you get copy Daughter of the Sun if you are familiar with Sekhmet you will find it an invaluable resource. If you are just learning about this Goddess for the first time like I am, it is a wonderful introduction.

Ryan, Co-Founder of the Pagan Collective of Victoria

Heka (Ancient Egyptian Magick)

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Heka is a system of magick within the Kemetic (Ancient Egyptian) tradition and the word itself means magickal and meaningful speech.  It is also the name of a netjer (God) within Kemeticism who is considered a patron of magick. The glyph of heka is depicted as a pair of raised arms and a twist of flax, which is thought to symbolise two interwoven serpents and which the netjer heka was able to hold power over and control. Heka manifested before duality had come into existence therefore its not a feminine or masculine force.  There are several patrons of heka within the Egyptian pantheon like A’set and Sekhmet but all netjers contain and can create heka.

Heka is employed through using, activating and projecting the ka, which is the part of the soul that contains the individual’s personality. In kemeticism – religion, heka and medicine are not separate states but are part of the same powerful energy. Heka is used to assist in accomplishing various tasks and warding off isfet (the concept of evil).  Heka can also be used by the common man and in Ancient Egypt the people of the day used heka for things from purifying their home to keeping vermin away.

Heka is always employed for a reason.  You would never go through the motions unless you want to work the energies to accomplish a goal you wish to see come to fruition. It is the magician who brings about the force of heka from their ka.  They do this through understanding and undertaking it via various acts which include: incantation, recitation, devotions, offerings, creating wax figures, amulets and various concoctions like poultices and potions just to name a few. Since words, actions and thoughts are magickal in themselves they have power and are essential in the working of heka.

Therefore, there are several steps needed to work heka – the thoughts which must be pure and focused, words which must be spoken and include intonations in a certain way, actions which must be enacted and often worked through in ritual formation and visual tools and ingredients used for focus and which primarily follow the like attracts like adage.  So in essence heka is written, spoken and enacted with ritualised gestures/motions and the use of sympathetic tools. Some forms of heka include effigies, charms, talismans, potions, incense blends, dream incubation, incantations, rituals, medicine and healing.  Heka can bring about prophecy, direction, health, prosperity, love, protection and fertility – pretty much anything you want or need.  When working heka one must purify themselves and remain that way throughout the working, make offerings and libations to the netjers (if they are asking for assistance from them), create and maintain focus of objective and have properly prepared tools and props at hand to assist with the desired result.

Heka was part of everyday life for the Ancient Egyptians and was employed in every stage of life from creation to death and the afterlife.  Similarly modern practitioners of the kemetic religion and other closely aligned magickal and theosophical systems ie Hermetisim view it the same way, to this day.

There are two types of magicians who use heka – trained priest-magicians part of the kemetic faith and dedicated to specific netjers or lay magicians who have no affiliations and are self trained or learn through other magicians. When a priest prays to a netjer for something it is the netjer who brings about the force of heka into the desire of the supplicant, as they are the agent of netjer. The lay magician however, holds and projects the magick into manifestation of desire and is usually employed for the services from others as well as for themselves.

 

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My personal path is a mix of the two types of sau heka (magician) and I employ various forms of heka in my daily life.  These can range from enacting various rituals in honour of my patrons to divining the future and creating protection amulets for others.  Here is some simple heka I would like to share with you, which you can use for yourself and your loved ones:

 

Heka to Protect the Home

In your active/dominant hand hold a stick of wood with meaning to you and walk around your home whilst reciting the following incantation:

“Withdraw disease demons!

The wind will not reach me,

And those who pass by,

may pass by to work disaster against me!

I am Horus who passes by the diseased ones of Sekhmet!

Horus – healthy despite Sekhmet!

I am the unique one,

Son of Bastest,

I die not through you!”

 

So as you can see from the above magickal working its very similar to some magickal practitioners of today – using a wand and casting a circle to protect one’s home from malevolent forces whilst reciting a spell to project the magick outwards and manifest it.

Like all forms of magick, heka can be dangerous to the uneducated and polluted heart.   So I implore that if heka is something you would like to learn more about and use – tread cautiously after much purification, divining of desire, introspection of reasoning, research, study and proper preparation.

 

(c) T. Georgitsis 2015

Healing with the Gods: Isis Seichim

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My main interest whilst studying naturopathy had always been Ancient Egyptian medicine and many of my assignments and pracs focused on that point of interest.  I devoured all natural medicine sources as well as Egyptological academia I could find and then, by chance, I stumbled across the vibrational healing modality Isis Seichim.  Reiki was thoroughly entrenched in the new age and holistic alternative medicine scene at this time and I had heard about an Ancient Egyptian flavoured reiki and was very eager to learn more about it.  What I discovered was that not much was available – all the teachers offering workshops at the time didn’t give much information on what it was, they had no manuals or notes as you just received the initiation and your certificate of completion.  I also struggled to find a teacher in the state I was living in and the workshops offered intestate and overseas were pricey to complete due to its niche market (also with little transparency I was reluctant to pay hundreds to thousands of dollars for it).

I wanted to find out more and learn about this vibrational healing modality whose connection was to Isis, the first Goddess I was ever sworn to and whom I continue to serve as her initiated priestess today.  I remained patient and years later come across my now retired master who taught from the heart and had a little bit more of the puzzle.  She encouraged me to progress further into the healing technique and find out more and master the energy within myself. I was then initiated into Isis Seichim and became a master, eventually teaching workshops and initiated students of my own.  I have created my own practitioner manual and developed my own workshop which consists of ritual and ceremony in honour of Isis and her devotees whilst trying to educate my students with the greatest amount of duty of care – to Isis, their clients and themselves.  This is just a fraction of what I discovered during my journey with Isis Seichim over the years.

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What are the origins of Isis Seichim?

Seichim (say sheem) comes from the Ancient Egyptian word “Sekhem” which translated into English means ‘Power of Powers”. Seichim is an advanced form of hands on healing having sounds and symbols whilst being said by many masters, that it is the parent energy of all hands on healing systems. Seichim is considered ancient and sacred, as it is believed by some vibrational healers and reiki masters to have originated in Atlantean times which in due course moved to Ancient Egypt.  Due to this connection over a millennia, the energy stream is infinite.  Various forms of Seichim healing systems are available today and those who have become involved in Seichim have received more symbols whilst being initiated, channelling, dreams, divination, ritual or through other practitioners and masters.

In a more traceable form Seichim can be linked to Patrick Zeigler who received the original intuinement of Seichim after having a deep mystical experience in the Kings Chamber of the Great Pyramid in Egypt during the early 1980s. Isis Seichim was later developed as a facet of Seichim which originated in Australia after Phoenix Summerfield (a student of Patrick’s) began teaching here in Australia.

What is Isis Seichim?

The knowledge that an unseen energy flows through all living things and is connected directly to the quality of health has been part of the wisdom of many cultures including the Ancient Egyptians since early times. We are alive because life force is flowing through us within the physical body as well as around us in a field of energy. Isis Seichim heals by raising the vibration of the energy found within the life force. Isis Seichim is a simple technique to learn but the ability to use Isis Seichim is not taught in the usual sense, but is transferred to the student by the Isis Seichim Master. Its use is not dependent on one’s intellectual capacity or spiritual development, therefore it is available to everyone. Utilising Isis Seichim feels like a wonderful glowing radiance which flows through you and surrounds you. Isis Seichim treats the whole person including body, mind, spirit and emotion – which is a natural, holistic and safe method of spiritual healing and self-improvement.

Isis Seichim is guided by the Deity – Isis (Consciousness) therefore it can never do harm. It is universal life force energy which always knows what a person needs and will adjust itself to create the effect that is appropriate for them. Isis Seichim is a channelled healing energy therefore an Isis Seichim practitioner’s energies is never depleted. In fact the Isis Seichim consciousness considers both practitioner and client to be in need of healing so both receive treatment. Because of this, giving a treatment always increases one’s energy and leaves one surrounded with loving feelings of well-being. Learning Isis Seichim is a good starting point for experiencing and working with healing energy and is a wonderful method for deepening awareness of universal energy.  In general, Isis Seichim complements other healing methods and spiritual practices.

Isis Seichim heals within 3 – 7 facets:

  1. Physical
  2. Etheric/Spiritual
  3. Emotional
  4. Mind (Higher)
  5. Buddic
  6. Atmic
  7. Monadic

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Although ancient in its essence, in modern times Isis Seichim can be regarded as renewed ancient healing wisdom as its an advanced form of telepathically directed “healing” which leads to a greater unfoldment and understanding of your spiritual self.

Isis Seichim:

  • Connects you to the divine source of the Deity Isis;
  • Is very powerful, but will not harm in any way;
  • Is soft and gentle whilst cleansing and purifying;
  • Heals at a very deep level, going to the core of a person’s whole state of being, both inner child and higher state;
  • Balances and aligns the aura and the chakras of the body;
  • Changes your vibration, usually by raising it (great for those wishing to tread a spiritual path);
  • Clears blockages from the mind, body and the aura;
  • Eases grief and helps to heal emotional issues;
  • Helps creates abundance by allowing the individual to accept they are worthy;
  • Clears toxins and promotes faster healing;
  • Relaxes and eases physical tension and pain; and
  • Expands your spirituality

For me, Isis Seichim has had a profound impact and how I connect to Isis whilst walking the healing path.

© T. Georgitsis 2016

Hathor Devotional Call Out!

I will be editing an upcoming devotional in honor of Hathor.
See below for further details of submission guidelines:

The Lady of the Sycamore:
A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Hathor

Bibliotheca Alexandrina is seeking submissions for Lady of the Sycamore: A Devotional Anthology in Honor of Hathor. This anthology opens for submissions on 1st November 2016 and closes on 1st May 2017, with a projected release date of August 2017.
 
Suggestions for possible contributions include, but are not limited to: prayers, heka, poetry, hymns, rituals, essays, short fiction, recipes, music, and artwork.
 
Those interested in contributing to this anthology are encouraged to explore the various titles and myths of this goddess, such as: Hathor as Goddess of Love; The Great One of Many Names; Lady of Stars; Mistress of the West; Lady of the Sycamore; Mistress of the Necropolis; Lady of the Turquoise; Lady of Malachite; Mistress of Music; Queen of the Harp Playing; Mistress of Jubilation; Queen of the Dance; Mistress of Inebriety Without End; Queen of Wreath Weaving; Mistress of Heaven; Celestial Nurse; Mother of Mothers; Hand of God; Lady of the Vulva; the Seven Hathors; and the Eye of Ra;
 
Hathor’s cults in Dendera, Philae, Timna and Luxor;
 
Hathor’s connections to and her relationships with other Deities, such as Horus the Elder, Ra, Aset/Isis, Sopdet, Nebethetepet, Nehebkau, Bat, Neith, Khnum, the Four Sons of Horus, Nut, Mut, Sobek, and Bast; 
 
Hathor’s Connection to the Menat and Sistrum, and her various symbols of power;
 
the role/s and power of Hathor’s Priests and Magicians in ancient Egypt and today;
 
Hathor’s connection to Ancient Egyptian Royalty;
the areas of influence and expertise over which this goddess holds domain, and their place in the ancient and modern world, e.g. fertility and motherhood, love, beauty, ecstasy, music, drunkenness, luxury, foreignness, the sun, cows and milk, divine wrath, hairdressing, et cetera; 
 
analysis of her place in The Book of the Celestial Cow and The Conflict of Horus and Seth;
compare/contrast Hathor and Deities in other pantheons (or who were adopted into the Egyptian pantheon), such as Aphrodite, Astarte, Dionysus, Freyja, and Venus;
 
and the nature of her worship and adoration in Ancient Egypt and among today’s practitioners and devotees.
 
All works submitted must be original, not plagiarized or public domain. Academic articles must provide proper citation for all sources used. Previously published submissions are acceptable, as long as the author retains all rights. The author will continue to retain all rights to any submissions accepted for this anthology. Upon acceptance, the author must complete the permission to publish form, including a brief author biography to be included in the anthology.
 
The editor reserves the right to make editorial changes to the spelling, grammar, and formatting of submission where appropriate. The editor may also ask the contributor to make modifications to the submission/s. The editor may reject submissions, as necessary. Contributors will be sent a preview .pdf of the manuscript, and will have one week to send any suggested corrections to the editor.
 
No monetary compensation will be provided, as proceeds from all sales will be divided between charitable donations in honor of the Deities and production costs for future publications from Bibliotheca Alexandrina. All contributors will receive a free .pdf of the final manuscript for personal use (not to be distributed) and a coupon code which will allow them to purchase three physical copies of the anthology at cost (plus shipping).
 
Send all submissions and queries to Tina Georgitsis at: tarotwithtina@yahoo.com.au
 
Acceptable length is 100-10,000 words (with the exception of poetry). All artwork must be at least 300dpi.

Hymn to Thoth on the Day of Thoth (Epagomenal Day 0)

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Hymn to Thoth

Adoration of Thoth, Son of Re, Moon,

Of beautiful rising, lord of appearings, light of the gods,

By the Prince, Count, Fan-bearer on the King’s right,

Great Troop-commander, Royal Scribe, Haremhab, justified,

  he says:

Hail to you, Moon, Thoth,

Bull in Khmun, dweller in Hesret,

Who makes way for the gods!

Who knows the secrets,

Who records their expression,

Who distinguishes one speech from another,

Who is judge of everyone.

Keen-faced in the Ship-of-millions,

Courier of mankind,

Who knows a man by his utterance,

Who makes the deed rise against the doer.

Who contents Re,

Advises the Sole Lord,

Lets him know whatever happens;

At dawn he summons in heaven,

And forgets not yesterday’s report.

Who makes safe the night-bark

Makes tranquil the day-bark,

With arms outstretched in the bow of the ship.

Pure-faced when he takes the stern-rope,

As the day-bark rejoices in the night-bark’s joy,

At the feast of crossing the sky.

Who fells the fiend,

Sunders western lightland.

The Ennead in the night-bark worships Thoth,

They say to him:  “Hail, [Son of] Re,

Praised of Re whom the gods applaud!”

They repeat what your ka wishes,

As you make way for the place of the bark,

As you act against the fiend:

You cut off his head, you break his ba,

You cast his corpse into the fire,

You are the god who slaughters him.

Nothing is done without your knowing,

Great one, son of a Great one, who came from her limbs,

Champion of Harakhti,

Wise friend in On,

Who makes the place of the gods,

Who knows the secrets,

Expounds their words.

Let us give praise to Thoth,

Straight plummet in the scales,

Who repulses evil,

Who accepts him who leans not on crime.

The vizier who settles cases,

Who changes turmoil to peace;

The scribe of the mat who keeps the book,

Who punishes crime,

Who accepts the submissive.

Who is sound of arm,

Wise among the ennead,

Who relates what was forgotten.

Counselor to him who errs,

Who remembers the fleeting moment,

Who reports the hour of the night,

Whose words endure forever,

Who enters dat, knows those in it,

And records them in the list.

(from scroll in lap of the statue of Horemheb, Lichtheim translation)



HYMN TO BAST

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Dua Bast!

Goddess of Warfare, Goddess of Protection

Ferocious mother against injustice

I apply your shield against isfet

Dua Bast! I pray to you!

 

Mistress of Boubastis, Mistress of Felines

United in heart I venerate you

Beyond the borders of the two lands, your devotee calls to you

Dua Bast! I adore you!

 

Lady of Dance, Lady of joy

I move to your heartbeat, the rhythm of the universe

In ecstatic sway to your celestial music

Dua Bast!  I dance for you!

 

Madam of the Rattle, Madam of the Basket

I make processions with sacred sounds in your favour

And the utterances of your name touches my soul

Dua Bast – I shake the sistra for you!

 

Lady of The Flame, Lady of the House

I raise and weave my voice in supplication

I croon in your light of everlasting sun and moon

Dua Bast – I sing for you!

 

Defender of the Pharoah, Defender of the People

May you slay those who utter atrocities in your name

Your servant waits your intervention

Dua Bast – I call to you!

 

Eye of Ra, Slayer of Apep

I surround myself with your love and banish feelings of detestation

Beloved, in your name will I always make pure offerings of oblation

Dua Bast! I make this sacrifice for you!

 

Keeper of the Aegis, Keeper of the Ointment Jar

Impeccable beauty and grace is your boon

Your imperfect perfection raises my vibration

Dua Bast! I make this commitment to you!

 

Great of Magick, Great of Might

I pour libations in your name and engage in your sacred ceremonies

May you always be by my side as I am your loyal attendee

Dua Bast! I make this vow to you!

T. Georgitsis 2014 ©