Hymns for Hekate

Sorceress” by John William Waterhouse 

One of the things I always do whilst honouring Hekate during my regular devotionals, is the use of hymns – in and with her name. I find it connects me to Her within seconds of reciting a hymn and I can feel Her flames of power coursing through the words.

Hymns can be used to evoke or invoke a specific Divinity in a ritual setting, during magickal work like spellcraft or when wanting to connect to the energies of a particular God (or multitude of Gods) for any other specific purpose. A hymn is a praising, adoring and devotional prayer to a Divinity which can be recited internally, out loud and even sung, written on various mediums and buried, tied to a tree, burned or thrown into a body of water or to the wind.

When I use hymns, I either employ them in the form of evocation or invocation. Evocation is when you summon, call forth or request a Deity in the form of askance or demand to be present. Invocation is when you call on Deity to take possession of you or another object like a statue image of that Deity.

Hymns can be as elaborate and complicated or simple and basic and it all depends on the devotees main goal and objective of the task at hand.  I advise that it comes from the heart and that the words truly resonate with you as words have power.  Ensure the hymn covers what you want to achieve and that could mean using a hymn written in ancient times or one which is more modern – the choice is yours.

When it comes to hymns written by another, I personally like to use The Orphic Hymn of Hekate. Here is a translation I use which I find quite beautiful:

The Orphic Hymns – Hymn I: To Hekate

(text: w. Quant Orphei hymni Berlin 1962)

I invoke you, beloved Hekate of the Crossroads and the Three Ways

Saffron-cloaked Goddess of the Heavens, the Underworld and the Sea

Tomb-frequenter, mystery-raving with the souls of the dead

Daughter of Perses, Lover of the Wilderness who exults among the deer

Nightgoing One, Protectress of dogs, Unconquerable Queen

Beast-roarer, Dishevelled One of compelling countenance

Tauropolos, Keyholding Mistress of the whole world

Ruler, Nymph, Mountain-wandering Nurturer of youth.

Maiden, I beg you to be present at these sacred rites

Ever with a gladsome heart and ever gracious to the Oxherd.

 

I have personally written several hymns in Hekate’s name, for various uses and reasons which are scattered all throughout my public writings and private workings. I urge you all to give your hand at writing a hymn to Hekate as I have found its one of the most profound offerings you can give this mighty Goddess.

Something I hear often is how do I write a hymn to Hekate?  I have developed some steps for you which can help:

  1. First of all you need to work out WHY?  Why do you feel the need to write Hekate a hymn?  You need to have an objective to be able to write with clarity and purpose.
  2. Next is what STYLE do you want to use? Do you want it to rhyme?  Do you want it to be a sing-song?  Do you           want it to be a freeform poem?
  3. What do you want to SAY?  What do you want to declare, invoke or proclaim?

Next I have come up with some tips which can hone your skills when it comes to writing hymns, they are:

  • TITLES: To start off use titles or characteristics (of Hekate) you want to manifest.
  • DESCRIPTIVE: Use descriptive imagery you want to evoke in your words.
  • MEANING: Use words which have meaning to you and don’t go throwing about thou and thee if you don’t use it in your everyday vocabulary.  It might sound flowery or pretty but the meaning is lost (and in my personal opinion can sound quite pompous or silly).  Also Use words which naturally express your true feelings and thoughts.  Put in what you want to get out and remember to be specific pay attention to details as words have power.
  • PARAPHRASING: Paraphrasing is a tried and tested way of creating hymns.  You can do this with an ancient hymn you are drawn to but please do not plagorise that is just bad form.
  • KISS: Use the Keep It Simple Stupid principle.  I’d suggest you start writing a hymn with something you are well versed in and comfortable.  Your ultimate goal is to honour her so remember to start with the basics and then work in more complicated ideas as you progress.
  • PRACTISE: I encourage you to try writing a hymn and use it.  If it works great if it doesn’t then edit and/or start again and rewrite.

Remember its all about the God/dess you are honouring so focus on that and give it a go.


(C) T. Georgitisis 2013 , Updated 2020

 

Book Review: Let Us Remember…A Devotional to Honor the Netjeru by Apryl R. Green-Muilenburg

 

LET US REMEMBER…A Devotional to Honor the Netjeru by Apryl R. Green-Muilenburg

This self-published book came out on the 21st January 2019 and is available through Amazon. As the book description states, Let Us Remember…A Devotional to Honor the Netjeru is a collection of hymns and prayers for use in ritual, invoking the *Netjeru as well as in devotional work to the Netjeru.

I originally discovered the author’s poetry through her Facebook posts and her blog (https://theferalgoddess.wordpress.com) where she writes evocative prose in honour of the Egyptian Gods as part of her regular devotion.  I was always eager to have these poems in one collection as I always found them so ethereally evocative and I am glad it’s come to pass.

Written by a modern practitioner and a devotional act within itself, this book is filled with beautiful prose and is a heartfelt offering. The poetry can be used in your spellwork, rituals and meditations to the Ancient Egyptian Gods or it can simply be used for the enjoyment of the prose.

Designed by Apryl herself, the front cover of the book shows an image of Isis, Queen of Magic and this depiction is perfect for the representation of the book, as it perfectly encapsulates the essence of this devotional.  Words are heka, and heka is magic in the Ancient Egyptian tradition and this book is a creation of magic in itself.

Apryl R. Green-Muilenburg’s qualifications in the tradition she writes about is impressive and solid.  Devotee and daughter of the Goddess Isis all her adult life, she is a Practicing Kemetic Witch, and Initiated Wiccan Priestess in the Isian Tradition, a Remetj in the House of Netjer and member of the Fellowship of Isis (FOI).

Apryl has been writing since she was a pre-teen, with previously published works in two anthologies honoring the Goddess Isis and Goddess Sekhmet respectively. She has a blog https://thescarlettedda.wordpress.com where she publishes her short stories written with a fairy tale twist based on personal life experiences as well as her feral prose at https://theferalgoddess.wordpress.com  She also has a Masters in Social Work from the University of Texas at Arlington and is an advocate for vulnerable populations, with a focus on our older adults. As Apryl has stated, she strives to bring a positive perspective to death and dying; emphasizing ancestor veneration/workings in her mundane and spiritual life.

 

With this in mind it makes this piece of work an artist’s vessel for illumination and connection to spirit.  When I received my copy of the book I was impressed by Apryl’s love of the gods which shone through the page like stars from the vaults of heaven.  So much so that I have taken to leaving it in my shrine so I can access it easily and use it when I am before both my ancestors and Gods in spiritual communion.

The quality of the book is exceptional and would make a perfect addition to any practitioner’s library, from anyone who is only briefly aware of the Ancient Egyptian Gods to those who are seasoned practitioners.

If you would like to purchase a copy please follow the link below and know you are supporting an independent artist who has made this for the love of the gods through her use of inspiring poetry:

LET US REMEMBER…: A Devotional to Honor the Netjeru

 

*Netjeru = Ancient Egyptian Gods in Kemetic.

Review by Setjataset 2019 (C) T. Georgitsis