Mystic Tribe Magazine: October 2019, Issue #23

In my regular column on crystals, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, I have written an article called “Ancient Egyptian Stones & Crystals Pt 1 which describes crystals in connection to the Ancient Egyptians, their magick and traditions as well as what they can do for you.  For your FREE copy follow this link:

October 2019 23rd editon Mystic Tribe Magazine V1

 

 

 

Mystic Tribe Magazine: September 2019, Issue #22

In my regular column on crystals, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, I have written an article called Dowsing with a Crystal Pendulum” which describes pendulums, what they can do for you, as well as different crystal pendulums and their uses.  For your FREE copy follow this link:

September 2019 22nd editon Mystic Tribe Magazine V1

 

 

 

 

Mystic Tribe Magazine: August 2019, Issue #21

In my regular column on crystals, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, I have written an article called “Isis Crytals” which describes Isian crystals, what they can do for you and the variations of the different types.  For your FREE copy follow this link:

August 2019 21st editon Mystic Tribe Magazine V1

 

 

 

 

2019 Sabbat Dates: Southern Hemisphere

 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2019

A Devotional to Honor the Netjeru

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Cant wait to get a hold on this amazing new book book – Let Us Remember: A Devotional to Honor the Egyptian Netjeru.

This book contains a collection of hymns and prayers for use in ritual, invoking the Netjeru as well as in devotional work to the Netjeru.

I have been reading Apryl’s work for years and its finally in a collection!

To purchase your copy go here:
 

2019 Moon Phases: Southern Hemisphere

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Specific magickal workings need to be conducted on specific moon phases*.  

Here are the New and Full Moon Phases for Eastern Standard Time in Australia for 2019:

 

New Moon Waxing Moon Full Moon Wanning Moon
6 Jan 12:28 pm 14 Jan 5:45 pm 21 Jan 4:16 pm 28 Jan 8:10 am
5 Feb 8:03 am 13 Feb 9:26 am 20 Feb 2:53 am 26 Feb 10:27 pm
7 Mar 3:03 am 14 Mar 9:27 pm 21 Mar 12:42 pm 28 Mar 3:09 pm
5 Apr 7:50 pm 13 Apr 5:05 am 19 Apr 9:12 pm 27 Apr 8:18 am
5 May 8:45 am 12 May 11:12 am 19 May 7:11 am 27 May 2:33 am
3 Jun 8:01 pm 10 Jun 3:59 pm 17 Jun 6:30 pm 25 Jun 7:46 pm
3 Jul 5:16 am 9 Jul 8:54 pm 17 Jul 7:38 am 25 Jul 11:18 am
1 Aug 1:11 pm 8 Aug 3:30 am 15 Aug 10:29 pm 24 Aug 12:56 am
30 Aug 8:37 pm 6 Sep 1:10 pm 14 Sep 2:32 pm 22 Sep 12:40 pm
29 Sep 4:26 am 6 Oct 3:47 am 14 Oct 8:07 am 21 Oct 11:39 pm
28 Oct 2:38 pm 4 Nov 9:23 pm 13 Nov 12:34 am 20 Nov 8:10 am
27 Nov 2:05 am 4 Dec 5:58 pm 12 Dec 4:12 pm 19 Dec 3:57 pm
26 Dec 4:13 pm

         

Full Moon (Psychic & Manifestation Work)

Waxing Moon (Invoking/Bringing In Workings)

Wanning Moon (Banishing/Pushing Out Workings)

New Moon (Psychic & Invoking Work)

Dark Moon (Banishing & Divination Workings)

 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2019

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Coming Soon: Handmade by Setjataset

Kemetic Wep Ronpet Dates 2018

Here is a basic Kemetic ritual for Wep Ronpet I wrote and use yearly:

Wep Ronpet Ritual

Here are the dates for the end of the year and Wep Ronpet:

July 28th Last Day of the Year: Feast of Lights at Esna (and Sais)

Epagomenal Day 00 – July 29th: Day Dedicated to Yinepu and Khonsu

Epagomenal Day 0 – July 30th: Day Dedicated to Djehuty

Epagomenal Day 1 – July 31st: Birthday of Wesir

Epagomenal Day 2 – August 1st: Birthday of Heru-wer

Epagomenal Day 3 – August 2nd: Birthday of Set

Epagomenal Day 4 – August 3rd: Birthday of Aset

Epagomenal Day 5 – August 4th: Birthday of Nebt-het

1 August 5th – Wep Ronpet

 

 

Working with Maat

 

Are you working with Maat?

How do you treat those around you or those you interact with and even yourself?

It is never too late to amend and update your practice.

Zep Tepi means you have a chance to try every time you are blessed with a new day,
in order for it to resonate with Maat.

Dont bring isfet into your life by going against Maat.

Be upstanding and ethical in your practice of daily life and
be the change you desire to see in the world.

Remember that words are Heka and so are actions and motivations.

Do things with proactive purpose, open awareness, compassion and kindness.

In the end, its up to you to decide how your heart will weigh up.

 

© T. Georgitsis 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fragrance of the Gods: Ancient Egyptian Incense

Incense in Ancient Egypt was seen as something containing the properties of life which could evoke belief and stabilise faith. It was thought by the ancients that incense brings about reverence as well as the manifestation of the Netjer it is being offered to.  The Ancient Egyptians even had a god of incense – Nefertum, the lion headed son of Sekhmet who in the creation myth was the lotus rising from the primordial waters.  Nefertum’s connection to scent and healing makes him the perfect patron of incense, especially since his symbol – the lotus, dawns every morning like incense smoke wafting towards the rays of the sun.

Incense has been a highly valued and used in Egypt all through its history.  This was made evident by its worth and the lengths the Ancient Egyptians would go to, to source it. Incense had a major role in the magickal and spiritual practices of Kemet and many expeditions were sent down to the Land of Punt (modern day Ethiopia or Sudan but scholars are yet to determine its exact location) to source rare and expensive resins used in incense blends.  Many pharaohs, noblemen and priests of Ancient Egypt would cultivate and propagate trees to keep up with the demand needed by the temples, tombs and residences of the time.

Various ceremonies in antiquity revolved around fumigation practices and in Ancient Egypt this has been evident in many reliefs and papyri describing these in detail, which has highlighted what a vital function it played.  The most common type of fumigation using incense in Ancient Egypt was used in a devotional act before representations of Netjer as well as for the Akhu at ancestor shrines or tombs.

The ancients believed that Netjer embodied the smoke of burning incense, as a romantic manifestation in the omissions of the lit incense they were offered by the priests and populace alike.  Like “God” the smoke from incense can permeate all, at times even without being visibly detected.  Priests therefore would offer incense as one of the ways to animate and reinvigorate Nejter’s manifest representation on earth, in the form of a ritual called “Opening of the Mouth”.  A way the priests could do this was by blowing through the censor containing the lit incense which activated the Heka through the breath whilst directing it.  Using incense to fumigate not only cleaned the temple and its possessions but it bestowed Heka through to the priests themselves as the scent activates communion with Netjer through an altered state which is induced.

It’s surprising to know that many recipes and processes for making incense was shrouded in secrecy but it was very well known that they contained specific instructions on how to create them with specific allocated time, ingredients with symbolic connections and Heka.  The priests who were responsible for creating incense for their Netjer’s did so with complete respect and devotion as if they were tending to the physical manifestation of the gods themselves – which they were in part, since making incense was seen as creating the body of the Gods.  Frankincense and myrrh resin gathered was referred to as “sweat” or “tears” of the Nejters and as such the Ancient Egyptians treated their frankincense and myrrh as emblems of their Gods bodies. The trees themselves were seen as fruitful goddesses who’s resin was divine menstrual blood.  So as you can see this emphasizes what great importance incense was to the daily rites of the Ancient Egyptians from their homes, workplaces, palaces and temples.

Today Egypt’s love of incense survives through the perfumery industry, the fragrant filled swinging censer of Coptic orthodox priests as well as the burning braziers found in the common people’s home shrines.   Many practicing Kemetics like myself make their own incense blends and one which is used as a staple go to for all Netjers and Heka is a compounded incense called Kyphi. Here is a recipe I’d like to share with you which you can easily make yourself:


 Ingredients:

3/4 (of a part) Honey

3 (parts) Raisins

1/4 (of a part) Copal

1/4 (of a part) Myrrh

1/4 (of a part) Orris Root Powder

1 (part) Sandalwood

1/4 (of a part) Storax

1/2 (of a part) Frankincense

1/2 (of a part) Cinnamon Powder

1/2 (of a part) Finely Ground Benzoin

Wine (enough to moisten entire mixture)

 

Method:

  1. Thoroughly grind all ingredients separately, and then mix together all the ingredients except for the benzoin.
  1. Add the wine to moisten, then form the mixture into small marble sized balls and roll them in the benzoin.
  1. Place and cure (dry) on baking paper until firm (a moon phase is the best time frame from experience.)

 

(c) T. Georgitsis 2015