Athenian Calendar 2018/19 (Southern Hemisphere)

The best time to honor Hekate is the Deipnon and Noumenia.  With that said, every year I create an Athenian Calendar to calculate the Deipnon and Noumenia using the Southern Hemisphere New Moons, to ensure my devotions are on the right evenings from my location.  This is calculated by the start off point of the Summer Solstice in Greece of that particular year.

The Athenian Calendar also known as the Attic Calendar was a lunisolar calendar used during the classical period of Ancient Greece during the 4th and 5th Centuries BC.  It was exclusively used in Athens at the time and each month starts at the first sighting of the new moon, with the year beginning just after mid-summer.  It’s become a modern go to for practicing Hellenics and as such, what we use and have today is a reconstruction of what they used around 300-500 BC.  I have superimposed this Athenian Calendar over our modern Gregorian one, to loosely create a festival calendar of 12 months based on the cycle of the moon which starts at the beginning of the Athenian year – on the summer solstice in Athens. The names of the months reflect the gods and festivals honoured at that time and have agricultural links to the planting or harvesting of food in the northern hemisphere.

Here is what the yearly Athenian Calendar basically looks like:

Summer (Θέρος)

1          Hekatombaion (Ἑκατομβαιών)           July/August

2          Metageitnion (Μεταγειτνιών)             August/September (named after Apollo)

3          Boedromion (Βοηδρομιών)                September/October

Autumn (Φθινόπωρον)

4          Pyanepsion (Πυανεψιών)                    October/November

5          Maimakterion (Μαιμακτηριών)          November/December (named after Zeus)

6          Poseideon (Ποσειδεών)                      December/January

Winter (Χεῖμα)

7          Gamelion (Γαμηλιών)                         January/February

8          Anthesterion (Ἀνθεστηριών)              February/March (named after the festival of Anthesteria)

9          Elaphebolion (Ἑλαφηβολιών)             March/April

Spring (Ἔαρ)

10        Mounichion (Μουνιχιών)                    April/May

11        Thargelion (Θαργηλιών)                     May/June

12        Skirophorion (Σκιροφοριών)              June/July

 

Every month lasts for approximately 29-30 days in total.  Each month is broken up into 10 days of three which reflect the moon phases in the following order: Waxing, Full and Waning Moons.

Days 1 to 8 were all sacred to gods or spirit entities and the last day of the month, known as “hene kai nea” translated as “the old and the new”, is dedicate to Hekate as it’s her Deipnon along with the first day of the month, Noumenia which is also dedicated to Hekate.

Here are the details of those 8 sacred days in the Athenian Calendar month:

Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon)

Day 2: Agathos Daimon

Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

Day 29-30: Deipnon

To get you all started with adapting the Athenian Calendar to the Gregorian one, here is the Athenian Calendar I created for 2019, calculated for Southern Hemisphere practitioners:

21 June 2019, = Summer Solstice in Greece (Winter Solstice in Australia 22nd June 1.54am EST)

 

Summer (Θέρος)

1 Hekatombaion (Ἑκατομβαιών)

3 July              Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 5.16am Athenian New Year

4 July              Day 2: Agathos Daimon

5 July              Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

6 July              Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

7 July              Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

8 July              Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

9 July              Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

31 July            Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

2 Metageitnion (Μεταγειτνιών) (named after Apollo)

1 August         Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 1.11pm

2 August         Day 2: Agathos Daimon

3 August         Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

4 August         Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

5 August         Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

6 August         Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

7 August         Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

29 August       Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

3 Boedromion (Βοηδρομιών)

30 August       Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 8.37pm

31 August       Day 2: Agathos Daimon

1 September   Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

2 September   Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

3 September   Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

4 September   Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

5 September   Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

28 September Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

Autumn (Φθινόπωρον)

4 Pyanepsion (Πυανεψιών)

29 September Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 4.26am

30 September Day 2: Agathos Daimon

1 October        Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

2 October        Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

3 October        Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

4 October        Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

5 October        Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

27 October      Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

5 Maimakterion (Μαιμακτηριών) (named after Zeus)

28 October      Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 2.38pm

29 October      Day 2: Agathos Daimon

30 October      Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

31 October      Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

1 November    Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

2 November    Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

2 November    Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

26 November  Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

6 Poseideon (Ποσειδεών)

27 November  Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 2.05am

28 November  Day 2: Agathos Daimon

29 November  Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

30 November  Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

1 December    Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

2 December    Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

3 December    Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

25 December  Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2019

Athenian Calendar 2018/19 (Southern Hemisphere)

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The best time to honor Hekate is the Deipnon and Noumenia.  With that said, every year I create an Athenian Calendar to calculate the Deipnon and Noumenia using the Southern Hemisphere New Moons, to ensure my devotions are on the right evenings from my location.  This is calculated by the start off point of the Summer Solstice in Greece of that particular year.

The Athenian Calendar also known as the Attic Calendar was a lunisolar calendar used during the classical period of Ancient Greece during the 4th and 5th Centuries BC.  It was exclusively used in Athens at the time and each month starts at the first sighting of the new moon, with the year beginning just after mid-summer.  It’s become a modern go to for practicing Hellenics and as such, what we use and have today is a reconstruction of what they used around 300-500 BC.  I have superimposed this Athenian Calendar over our modern Gregorian one, to loosely create a festival calendar of 12 months based on the cycle of the moon which starts at the beginning of the Athenian year – on the summer solstice in Athens. The names of the months reflect the gods and festivals honored at that time and have agricultural links to the planting or harvesting of food in the northern hemisphere.

Here is what the yearly Athenian Calendar basically looks like:

Summer (Θέρος)

1          Hekatombaion (Ἑκατομβαιών)           July/August

2          Metageitnion (Μεταγειτνιών)             August/September (named after Apollo)

3          Boedromion (Βοηδρομιών)                September/October

Autumn (Φθινόπωρον)

4          Pyanepsion (Πυανεψιών)                    October/November

5          Maimakterion (Μαιμακτηριών)          November/December (named after Zeus)

6          Poseideon (Ποσειδεών)                      December/January

Winter (Χεῖμα)

7          Gamelion (Γαμηλιών)                         January/February

8          Anthesterion (Ἀνθεστηριών)              February/March (named after the festival of Anthesteria)

9          Elaphebolion (Ἑλαφηβολιών)             March/April

Spring (Ἔαρ)

10        Mounichion (Μουνιχιών)                    April/May

11        Thargelion (Θαργηλιών)                     May/June

12        Skirophorion (Σκιροφοριών)              June/July

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Every month lasts for approximately 29-30 days in total.  Each month is broken up into 10 days of three which reflect the moon phases in the following order: Waxing, Full and Waning Moons.

Days 1 to 8 were all sacred to gods or spirit entities and the last day of the month, known as “hene kai nea” translated as “the old and the new”, is dedicate to Hekate as it’s her Deipnon along with the first day of the month, Noumenia which is also dedicated to Hekate.

Here are the details of those 8 sacred days in the Athenian Calendar month:

Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon)

Day 2: Agathos Daimon

Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

Day 29-30: Deipnon

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To get you all started with adapting the Athenian Calendar to the Gregorian one, here is the Athenian Calendar I created for 2018, calculated for Southern Hemisphere practitioners:

21 June 2018, 1.07pm = Summer Solstice in Greece (Winter Solstice in Australia 8.07pm)

Summer (Θέρος)

1          Hekatombaion (Ἑκατομβαιών) July/August

13 July                   Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 12.47pm – Super New Moon & Athenian New Year

14 July                   Day 2: Agathos Daimon

15 July                   Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

16 July                   Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

17 July                   Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

18 July                   Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

19 July                   Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

10 August              Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

2          Metageitnion (Μεταγειτνιών) August/September (named after Apollo)

11 August               Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 7.57pm – Super New Moon

12 August               Day 2: Agathos Daimon

13 August               Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

14 August               Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

15 August               Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

16 August               Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

17 August               Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

9 September           Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

3          Boedromion (Βοηδρομιών) September/October

10 September         Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 4.01am

11 September         Day 2: Agathos Daimon

12 September         Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

13 September         Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

14 September         Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

15 September         Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

16 September         Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

8 October                Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

Autumn (Φθινόπωρον)

4          Pyanepsion (Πυανεψιών) October/November

9 October               Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 2.46pm

10 October             Day 2: Agathos Daimon

11 October             Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

12 October             Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

13 October             Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

14 October             Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

15 October             Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

7 November           Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

5          Maimakterion (Μαιμακτηριών) November/December (named after Zeus)

8 November           Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 3.01am

9 November           Day 2: Agathos Daimon

10 November         Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

11 November         Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

12 November         Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

13 November         Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

14 November         Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

6 December            Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

6          Poseideon (Ποσειδεών) December/January

7 December           Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 6.20am

8 December           Day 2: Agathos Daimon

9 December           Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

10 December         Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

11 December         Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

12 December         Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

13 December         Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

5 January 2019      Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2018

2017 Moon Phases: Melbourne, Australia

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Specific magickal workings need to be conducted on specific moon phases.  Here are the  New and Full Moon Phases for Melbourne, Victoria, Australia in 2017:

 

New Moon

Full Moon
    12 Jan 10:33 pm
28 Jan 11:07 am 11 Feb 11:32 am
27 Feb 1:58 am 13 Mar 1:53 am
28 Mar 1:57 pm 11 Apr 4:08 pm
26 Apr 10:16 pm 11 May 7:42 am
26 May 5:44 am 9 Jun 11:09 pm
24 Jun 12:30 pm 9 Jul 2:06 pm
23 Jul 7:45 pm 8 Aug 4:10 am
22 Aug 4:30 am 6 Sep 5:02 pm
20 Sep 3:29 pm 6 Oct 5:40 am
20 Oct 6:12 am 4 Nov 4:22 pm
18 Nov 10:42 pm 4 Dec 2:46 am

18 Dec

5:30 pm

 

Hekate Self Initiation

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One of the simplest rituals I have created and completed is a self-initiation and dedication to a deity.  Here is a ritual I wrote many moons ago for Hekate which you might find useful and which you can use as a guideline when writing your own ritual:

Hekate Self Initiation

Performed on Sunset/Sunrise in a liminal place.

Items Needed:

  • 1 black candle
  • 2 white candles
  • 1 lighter/matches
  • 2 coins
  • 2 keys
  • 1 glass of wine or grape juice
  • Moon cakes
  • 1 glass of water
  • Salt
  • Hekate incense or similar
  • Charcoal
  • Incense burner
  • Hekate oil or similar
  • Pad and pen

Preparation:

Clean the working space and neutralize energies.  This can be done by completing the LBRP, sweeping the space with a broom, clearing the temple with incense and khernips etc.

Ensure alter is set up with items needed.

Anoint the black candle with the Hekate oil.

Anoint self with Hekate oil between the brow.

Create Sacred Space

In any manner you are accustomed to.

Magickal Working

As a sign of devotion offer Hekate a coin, a white candle and a key.

(The coin can be given to a charity or left at a crossroads after the ritual, the white candle can be used when invoking Hekate and the key can be used when working with Hekate to unlock mysteries or connect to her).

Light the black candle and Invoke Hekate by reciting a prayer written in her name.

Make an offering to Hekate consisting of wine and moon cakes.

Speak to Hekate in your own words.  Tell Hekate that you are dedicating yourself to her service and let her know what you can offer her as her devotee.  Share with her where you are at in your life and what you feel is holding you back and what you want to achieve.  Ask Hekate for her blessings, guidance and help.  Remember to be clear and concise with your words.

After you have done this visualise Hekate unlocking a door and opening it before you, she hands you a key as you pass through the door and there you find a crossroad before you.  Hekate holds her arms up before her in witch pose and lights the appropriate path before you with her blazing torches.  Hekate hands you a torch and beckons you to walk along beside her as she guides you down the illuminated path.  Follow the illuminated path until you find the answer you seek. After you have found the answer you seek thank Hekate for her assistance and farewell her.  Record any insights or advice given.

Close Sacred Space

In any manner you are accustomed to similar to creating sacred space.

(C) T. Georgitsis 2010

 

Spirit of Place: Mummymania Exhibit

The Ian Potter Museum currently has a “Mummymania” Exhibition happening right now until the 17th of April in Melbourne for free…taken from the exhibit website:

Mummymania focuses on the figure of the Egyptian mummy and its role within the themes of life, death, resurrection and immortality. Ranging from the mummy’s original role in ancient Egyptian funerary practices to its importance in early scientific investigations into ancient disease and medicine, and its popular reception as a malevolent Hollywood monster-figure, the exhibition looks at the changing perception of the mummy over time.

Mummymania includes a small number of mummified objects that reveal the mummification process in ancient Egypt and its relationship to Egyptian afterlife beliefs. The history of the exploration of Egypt by Europeans and the export of ancient Egyptian antiquities including mummies also features, including the public mummy-unrolling spectacles that were popular in the nineteenth century. The pivotal use of mummies in medicine, and the scientific analysis of tissue including the use of CAT scanning in order to understand ancient disease, is an important aspect of the legacy that is not widely known. This lesser known history is explored alongside the mummy’s well-known role as a Hollywood horror film star.

I have taken some images I would like to share with you from the exhibition which were my favourite items displayed (no images of remains were taken due to the nature of the images being something I personally don’t feel comfortable with):

 

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Ptah holding a Was Sceptre Ptolemaic period

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Sekhmet statue in bronze Ptolemaic period

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Limestone Stela of Female Late Roman Period

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Sandstone T shaped offering Table Late Period

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Faïence pendants of New to Late Period

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Limestone Stela Ptolemaic Period

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Ushabti Late Period

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Terracotta lamps Coptic period

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Death mask of a woman Roman Period

 

All images (C) T. Georgitsis 2016

 

 

 

Organic Chinese Tea Appreciation: Glenferrie Tea House

Last year I found out the Glenferrie Tea House started to offer organic chinese tea appreciation sessions so I booked myself in as I have an obsession with tea.

The appreciation session lasted for about 2 hours and was set in the master tea makers home complete with traditional tea table and chairs.

set up 1

The different types of teas we tried were white tea (top near the small tea cups) and in order from left to right (bottom near prosperity pigs) were oolong also known as red tea, green tea and black tea.

My favourite was the Green tea which was the Green Puerh and the Oolong tea known as Red Puerh was perfect for my constitution (love it when my natural medicine knowledge can be used).  I found the Black Tea known as Hei Cha was the longest fermented we had at 10 years old which had an interesting flavour, since I’d never had black tea before.  All teas were from the same region in China – Yunnan Province and other than the loose non fermented White and Green were packed as disks.

tea

I learned so much about Traditional Chinese Tea I never knew before.  The things which stood out for me was the first brew of any tea is the tea wash to remove any impurities from the processing of the herbs and should not be drunk.  Also white tea and green teas only make about 5 good brews whilst red and black can make up to 10-15 and the notes change drastically with each brew.  Lastly White and Green tea shouldn’t be kept past 1 year after its been exposed to the air as its worthless unlike black or red tea which can last longer due to the fermentation (similar to wine).

The great thing is I have confirmation that my palette is still delicate as I could definitely taste the notes in the various teas (flowers in the green, chocolate in the black etc) and asked about them which impressed the tea master even though that was not my intention – just wanted to make sure I was tasting it right.

white tea trying

 

All images (C) T. Georgitsis 2016

 

 

 

Spirit of Place: Tesselaar Tulip Festival (Part 3 of 3)

At the Tesselaar Tulip Festival there was more on than just tulips…there was some art too…these were my favourites:

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There was also clog dancing in full costume:

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An old timey pipe organ raising money for charity:

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Display and workshops on how to make wooden tulips:

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And of course there were windmills tucked away everywhere:

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All images (C) T. Georgitsis 2015

 

 

 

Spirit of Place: Tesselaar Tulip Festival (Part 2 of 3)

 

I loved seeing the tulips blooming all throughout the farm. Shows that spring is truly here!

These were some more images I managed to capture with my iphone, of some other favourites I came across which I couldn’t identify due to lack of signage or the like…

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Then you have the fields of tulips which are just so eye catching and beautiful you almost feel like you are in Holland…except for all the people taking selfies in the middle of the fields 😉

 

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All images (C) T. Georgitsis 2015

Spirit of Place: Tesselaar Tulip Festival (Part 1 of 3)

 

Every spring for 4 weeks the Tesselaar Tulip Festival happens in Silvan (country Victoria, Australia).

This year I went during the Dutch Weekend (I mean they are known for their tulips no).  They had transformed the tulip farm into a mini-Holland with food, costumes, folk dancing, barrel organ music, market stalls, windmills, games and historical displays.  There was also sculptures among the tulips from artists around the country.  The festival runs for two more weeks and for more information see here: http://www.tulipfestival.com.au

These were my favourite tulips which I remember the name of:

 

The “precocious” 

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The “salvo” 12032024_10154364817194762_6106948914409796382_n

The “high roller” 

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The “gavota” 

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The “poppy”

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All images (C) T. Georgitsis 2015

 

 

 

Spirit of Place: Rippon Lea Estate (Grounds Of Mansion)

First part of my post on Rippon Lea is here:
https://setjataset.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/spirit-of-place-rippon-lea-estate-inside-the-mansion/

The grounds of Rippon Lea are immaculately kept and are quite serene and lovely whilst also containing lots of plants and trees which are heritage listed also.

Outside the mansion and on the grounds:

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All images (C) T. Georgitsis 2015