Mystic Tribe Magazine: June 2020, Issue #31


In my regular column on crystals, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, I have written an article called Hecate’s Crystals”  in which I describe who Hekate is and a list of her crystals which can be used for devotional, spiritual and magical purposes. For your FREE copy follow this link:

Mystic Tribe – June 2020, Issue 301

 

 

 

Hellenic Hekate Ritual: Dedication of a Home Shrine to Hekate

Like the Ancient Greeks, Anatolians and Romans, Hekate has always had a place in my home.  In times gone by, shrines to Hekate were placed above doorways to people’s homes, at the entries to cities, villages and towns as well as the roads traveled in between (predominately at a three way crossroads).  This was done as a way to supplicate Hekate’s connection as Queen of the Dead and Sorcery and to ensure the dwellers and travelers were protected from the restless dead and evil magick.  Offerings were made in these liminal places during the new moon to show devotion and request protection.

In modern times many Hellenic practitioners, witches, magicians and the like continue this tradition and create a shrine in her name.  The most ideal place to create a shrine in Hekate’s name is within the home, in a place of high volume of traffic, like the lounge room or near the front or back door of the home.  To create a basic shrine to Hekate ensure it contains an image representing her, a flame of some kind, sacred water, incense and offerings.  An example can be seen below which is my Sanctuary of Hekate’s Crossroads shrine in my home:

It’s prudent to dedicate your shrine when creating it in honour of Hekate as is ensuring the shrine is kept in a state of clean and good repair. Making fresh offerings on Noumenia and cleaning shrines during the Deipnon is traditional and ensures it’s done on a regular basis. Here are some simple steps of how to dedicate a home shrine to Hekate:

Hellenic Hekate Dedication of a Shrine © Setjataset 2020

Preparation:

Chose a liminal time and place for the ritual to be set.

Purify body by showering or washing head, hands and feet.

Clean and purify your shrine and all items which will be placed on the shrine.

Your shrine items should include: purified water/khernips, barley seeds, asperging herbs (small bundle purifying herbs such as bay leaves), oil lamp/candle, resin incense and incense holder (such as heatproof bowl) and an image of Hekate.

Your offering items which can include perishable and non perishable items.

Create a Dedication of Purpose of Shrine.  This dedication should include the reason for setting up the shrine to Hekate and what you will be doing on it ie Honour Hekate and perform magick and ritual, to have a special space specifically dedicated to Hekate only.

Ritual:

Wash your hands in khernips/purified water before standing before your shrine, whilst saying:

Αφήστε όλα αυτά που είναι βλαβερά να φύγουν! (Let all that is profane be gone!)

Present the offerings to Hekate by holding them up in a gesture of oblation and place them on the shrine. You do not need to speak to do this but may say a few words as a statement of purpose if you are inspired.

Take your asperging herbs and dip into khernips/purified water and flick water onto the shrine.

Take a handful of barley and throw them onto the shrine.

When complete say:

Xerniptosai! (Be Purified!)

Light the oil lamp/candle.

Light the incense.

Invocation

Evoke Hekate with the following:

Hekate your devotee calls to you

Inhabit and bless this shrine created in your name

Hekate your practitioner calls to you

Charge and concentrate this shrine in your honour

Hekate your child calls to you

May you dwell here in your sanctuary 

Touch your forehead, lips, heart and tap the shrine – repeat 3 times.

Praxis (Working Proper)

Read out your Dedication of Purpose of Shrine.

Thanks and Closing

Thank Hekate by saying:

Hekate, in your name I created this shrine.  In your name, may it remain consecrated. 

Blow out candles and put out incense.

Step away from the shrine by backing away, turning to the right and leaving without looking back.

Ritual is now complete and any feasting can take place.


(C) T. Georgitsis 2020

Hekate Magick: Lunar Eclipse

The Magick of the Eclipse

The full moon lunar eclipse is happening this June full moon on the 6th (3.45am – 5.12am EST).

Eclipse magick is when the energy is amplified due to the moon energies intermingling.  The Lunar Eclipse energies transition through the new and full moon phases during the eclipse, which enables the moon to cycle through the various stages of the moon and its magick.

There are various types of magick you can perform during the Lunar Eclipse:

  • Liminal – magick worked between the darkness and the light.
  • Manifestation – setting goals, intentions and affirmations.
  • Breaking – curses, bad habits, bad relationships and connections.
  • Transformation – self/surroundings, spellwork and health encompassing all aspects of oneself (body/mind/spirit and emotion).
  • Devotion – to lunar or liminal Gods and Goddess.
  • Focus – personal and spiritual development along with illumination and psychic work (divination and magickal goals).

Right now our world is suffering through much turmoil whether it be the pandemic or race riots and as such our energies are scattered and stagnant.

This lunar eclipse is a good time to clear the energies which no longer aid you in preparation for the next phase in your life.

Now is the time to work on breaking the bonds which drag you down and transform it into manifesting that which raises you up.

Since the full moon is in Sagittarius it will be an intense full eclipse, therefore I suggest working on the self and releasing the frustration and anger in a proactive way. Below I have outlined an easy rite you can perform in any tradition you resonate to, with the guidance of Hekate:

Hekate Eclipse Magick by Setjataset

Preparation:

Chose a liminal time and place for the ritual to be set, preferably outside if you can manage it under the full moon or alternatively where the moon beams can shine upon your workings.

Purify body by showering or washing head, hands and feet.

Your shrine and offering items should be placed on a shrine or working altar and should include: black candle, red candle (or white/neutral coloured candles if you don’t have red/black), purified water/khernips mixed with salt, a token or offering you have for Hekate, incense and an image of Hekate.

Welcoming and Opening

Open sacred space or the shrine/altar and welcome Hekate by simply calling to her or reciting a hymn, poem, evocation in her name.

Light your incense and waft over sacred space.

Sprinkle purified salted water over sacred space.

 

Magical Working

Write (with a sharpie) or carve (with a blade, wand, knife, pin, fingernail) on a black candle what you want to get rid of.

If you don’t have a black candle use a white or neutral colour and write on the candle a word representing what you want to get rid of ie procrastination.  Think about it carefully and don’t be rash in what it is you are wanting to get rid of and make sure its what you really want.

Write (with a sharpie) or carve (with a blade, wand, knife, pin, fingernail) on a red candle what you want to bring in.

If you don’t have a red candle use a white or neutral colour and write on the candle a word representing what you want to bring in ie self-love.  Think about it carefully and don’t be rash in what it is you are wanting to bring in and make sure its what you really want.

If so desired, anoint candles.  Use an oil such as Abramelin oil or something simple such as olive or lavender oil.  If you have no oil, use your own saliva.

Light both candles.

Push the black candle away from you and the red candle towards you and then say:

“Hekate Queen of Earth, Sky and Sea

Assist me to straddle this liminal time

Guide me through the Darkness and into the Light

With the power of the moon I bless and release my intentions”  © T. Georgitsis 2020

Let the candles burn down completely in a safe manner.

Thanks and Closing

Thank Hekate and close sacred space or the shrine/altar.

Ritual is now complete and any feasting and/or grounding work can take place.

Do not speak about your working until it has manifested and even then be cautious with how you share it.


© T. Georgitsis 2020

Hellenic Hekate Ritual: Element of Fire

Fire is one of the classical elements in Hellenic philosophy and practice.  Fire is a fundamental element in creating the world and gave birth to the other elements.  Fire was very valuable for the Hellenics and today that element is still a focus in modern Hellenic ritual.  Fire in the witches pyramid symbolises To Will – to manifest magick through application which is done through ritual, which in and of itself is very magickal.

Rituals in Hellenic practice have always had an element of fire whether it be the hearth, lamp, candle or offerings being lit. In Hellenic philosophy, fire was associated with passion, assertiveness and energy – something which Hekate embodies completely.  Hekate also has her own strong connection to fire, both in her mythology and in her rites.

Hekate used fire as a tool of power during the war against the titans, as quoted here by the Greek mythographer Pseudo-Apollodorus in Bibliotheca 1.34-38:

When the Gigantes made war on the gods of heaven. In the course of the battle….Hekate got [the Gigante] Klytios with fire-brands.

Fire-brands are pieces of burning wood like torches and continuing with this mythology, Hekate appears in a number of ancient vase paintings battling a giant with her twin torches.

 

(Hekate & Cerberus
Antikensammlungen, Munich) 

 

In the abduction of Persephone by Hades, Hekate goes to Demeter to tell her what she has seen. Hekate does this with flaming torches in hand through the night.  In this instance, Hekate is using the flame to guide and illuminate the path she takes between realms she has dominion over.  This myth highlighting Hekate’s fire lit accompaniment is highlighted in the Homeric Hymn to Demeter (19):

Then for nine days queenly Deo [Demeter] wandered over the earth with flaming torches in her hands, so grieved that she never tasted ambrosia and the sweet draught of nektaros, nor sprinkled her body with water. But when the tenth enlightening dawn had come, Hekate, with a torch in her hands, met her, and spoke to her and told her news: `Queenly Demeter, bringer of seasons and giver of good gifts, what god of heaven or what mortal man has rapt away Persephone and pierced with sorrow your dear heart? For I heard her voice, yet saw not with my eyes who it was. But I tell you truly and shortly all I know.’

So, then, said Hekate. And the daughter of rich-haired Rheia answered her not, but sped swiftly with her, holding flaming torches in her hands. So they came to Helios (the Sun), who is watchman of both gods and men, and stood in front of his horses: and the bright goddess enquired of him.”

(Translated by Evelyn-White)

 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2010

 

The element of fire is creative and it is the element of action just like Hekate.  Fire is at the hearth of the home, a place where Hekate’s shrine is placed.  Fire illuminates and brightens the darkness allowing us to see which way we need to go and Hekate’s role as psychopomp can help us with that.  Here is a ritual I would like to share with you which you can use to honour Hekate in a Hellenic way and which utilises the element of fire:

 

Hellenic Hekate Fire Ritual © Setjataset 2015

Preparation:

Chose a liminal time and place for the ritual to be set, preferably outside if you can manage it.

Purify body by showering or washing head, hands and feet.

Your shrine and offering items should be placed in a basket or bag which are easily carried which should include purified water/khernips, asperging herbs (small bundle purifying herbs such as bay leaves), any offerings you have for Hekate which should include something for a libation – olive oil/wine/honey’d milk, a red pen, white paper, a fireproof bowl and an fire pit/oil lamp/brazier/candle, resin incense and an image of Hekate.

Ritual:

Procession

Form a formal procession and walk towards the shrine from the east, carrying the offerings and shrine items with you.

Wash your hands in khernips/purified water before assembling before your shrine, whilst saying:

Αφήστε όλα αυτά που είναι βλαβερά να φύγουν! (Let all that is profane be gone!)

Present the offerings to Hekate by holding them up in a gesture of oblation and place them on the shrine. You do not need to speak to do this but may say a few words as a statement of purpose if you are inspired.

Take your asperging herbs and dip into khernips/purified water and flick water onto the shrine whilst saying:

Xerniptosai! (Be Purified!)

Light the oil lamp/candle.

Invocation

Light a fire pit, oil lamp, brazier or candle for Hekate.

Throw or sprinkle incense into the fire.

Read out loud or sing a hymn in Hekate’s name.

Preces (Prayer Proper)

Write a petition of something you want to ignite/bring into your life to Hekate using the pen and paper.

Pour a libation of oil, wine or honey’d milk to Hekate upon the ground.

Praxis (Working Proper)

Read your petition out loud three times.

Blow on your petition three times.

                   Tap your petition on the ground three times.

Set fire to your petition and watch it burn visualising your desire manifesting.

Thanks and Closing

Thank Hekate by saying:

Hekate, in your name we gathered, in your name we depart.  Thank you for your eternal illumination and blessings.

Step away from the ritual space by backing away, turning to the right and leaving without looking back.

Ritual is now complete and any feasting can take place.

Do not speak about your petition until it has manifested and even then be cautious with how you share it.


Orphic Hymn Translated by Evelyn-White

(C) T. Georgitsis 2015, Updated 2020

Hekate’s Noumenia by Setjataset

 

Noumenia also known as the New Moon is the first day of the lunar month in the Athenian Calender* and a time when the first sliver of the moon appears in the night sky, right after the Deipnon (Dark of the Moon).

Noumenia is the second day in a three day household celebration, which is held each month in the Hellenic tradition. Historically it was considered a time when religious observance occured at home, the temples and in public. This sacred day was celebrated with much frivolity and feasting and acknowledged the household gods. Even though technically Hekate’s day fell on the Deipnon she was also viewed as a deity whose domain covered the home.

Hekate’s Noumenia is a time to:

  1. Clean your home and decorate your shrine/altars with fresh flowers and herbs.
  2. Leave fresh food and drinks offerings on shrines/altars.
  3. Feasting in Her name. 

When it comes to the devotional practice of Hekate, Noumenia is the time to leave fresh offerings after the old ones have been cleared away during the Deipnon rites – as a form of inviting her blessings.

 

2014 (C) T. Georgitsis

 

Some traditional offerings to leave out for Hekate’s Noumenia are:

Fresh meat, incense, barley, wine and cakes.

Some modern offerings to leave out for Hekate’s Noumenia are:

Incense, wine, cakes, bread, honey, barley, olive oil, cheese, salt, items from nature (shells, flowers, herbs, fruit, rocks/stones/crystals water from the ocean/river/lake) or magically created crafts such as art in her name.

Light follows darkness and so Noumenia comes after the Deipnon which is the darkest night of the month. This shows us that there is an ongoing dual nature of the universe and that one can’t survive without the other. As The Gods children, we celebrate our triumphant progression through life’s cycles of death and rebirth which we see emphasized through nature all around us and which we revel in during sacred days like the Noumenia. 

 

Noumenia Shrine 2012 (C) T. Georgitsis

 

Traditional practice of Noumenia in Ancient Greece found in academia shows us that there was a public ritual on the Acropolis, whilst in Sparta food and drink were freely given to the populace by the King. In the common man’s home a family meal gathering was the focus and it included cleaning and decorating the household shrines with garlands of herbs and flowers. No other events or celebrations were held in Ancient Greece on this day, such was its significance that it needed to be focused on completely.

Current modern devotees practice similar to their counterparts in Ancient Greece. They make offerings upon their home shrine which can be in the same form as the ancients and include modern favourites such as cheese cake and honey bread. The Noumenia is also the perfect time to embark on new projects, trips, partnerships, work on goals and set new tasks.

I personally recommend you write your own Noumenia ritual ensuring it consists of the following basics: 

  1. Procession to home or Hekate shrine.
  2. Purification through the use of khernips** on self, sacred/temple space and shrine and throwing pearl barley upon the sacred/temple space and shrine.
  3. Light the sacred flame (candle or oil lamp).
  4. Libation of purified water or wine with simple blessing or invitation to Hekate (traditionally and in modern practice Hestia is always offered water or wine first and last with an accompanying blessing/invocation in ritual).
  5. Offerings which include barley, wine, honey, olive oil, salt, bread, cheese, frankincense, myrrh, bay laurel and round cakes. The kathiskos can be placed upon the shrine at this time.
  6. Sing or read out hymns in honour of Hekate which you have written yourself or you resonate with.
  7. Libation of purified water or wine with thanks and farewell to Hekate and the same with Hestia which is done as a conclusion/ending of the rite.

Noumenia Shrine 2011 (C) T. Georgitsis

 

Noumenia is the perfect time to create or replenish a kathiskos*** with purified water, barley, olive oil and food remnants from the day’s meal. Here is a simple way to make one for your own practice. 

How to make a Kathiskos for Hekate © T. Georgitsis 2014 

Ingredients: 

    • Glass jar with tight lid
    • Offerings: purified water, pearl barley, salt, olive oil, wine and leftovers.
    • Red, black or white ribbon, cord or embroidery thread.
    • Key or coin which represents Hekate to you. 

Method: 

1. Ensure the glass jar is clean and dry. 

2. Place the offerings in the jar in the following order: pearl barley, salt, olive oil, leftovers and then top up the rest of the jar with purified water. 

3. Seal tightly with the lid – just as a heads up the contents of the kathiskos might spoil and rot before its thrown out during the Deipnon and replaced during the Noumenia, so be warned to ensure that you have sealed it tightly. 

4. Tie a ribbon, cord or thread looped with a key or coin around the lid of the jar. 

5. Place upon Hekate’s shrine. 

Whatever you decide to do for Hekate during the Noumenia, ensure it is pure of heart and effort and that you do your best with what you have or can acquire.


* Also known as the Attic Calendar. 

** Sacred water which is pure like from a sacred spring. 

***Was traditionally made for Zeus and means “small bucket” in Greek. It’s a small sealed jar which is used to contain a portion of your home’s food prosperity to Deity. 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2014 – Updated 2020

 

 

 

Mystic Tribe Magazine: May 2020, Issue #30


In my regular column on crystals, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, I have written an article called “Ancient Egyptian Crystal Shapes and their Influences” in which I describe a few crystal shapes predominant in Ancient Egypt and how you can use them int he modern time. For your FREE copy follow this link:

Mystic Tribe – May 2020, Issue 30

 

 

 

Hekate Magick: Samhain for her Witches

deipnon-september 2013

Samhain is celebrated as the witches new year and is the time when the veil between the worlds is at its thinnest and therefore perfect for divination or contacting the dead.  Hekate’s connection to witches can be traced back to classical Greece where they worked with her for various incantations, spells and called upon her for assistance and blessings.

Hekate, the Virgin Titaness who prefers solitude, Goddess of the Sea, Earth and Sky, Light Bearer and revealer to those who seek, Keeper of the Crossroads who roams the cemeteries for lost souls, Queen of Magic and the Night, Key Bearer who has access to the otherworld and can commune with those who have passed between the veils, Goddess of Ghosts and Necromancy, Patron of Travellers who guides them to their destination.

Goddess of Witchcraft, Magic and Ghosts – Hekate in my opinion exudes the energy of Samhain. During Samhain, Hekate – the Embodiment of Death, roams the earth and is therefore one of the most suitable Gods to honour during this time.  Since Hekate is known as Goddess of the Dead, Mistress of Souls who can accompany the departed between the realm of the living and that of the dead, witches have naturally been drawn to call upon her during the Festival of the Dead: Samhain also known as Halloween.  Hekate can be called upon as an intermediary to connect you to your ancestors especially since our dearly departed tend to visit us during Samhain.  Also communing with the ancestors during this time can reveal future fate and Hekate can also be of assistance when divining.

Venerating the ancestors and Hekate during this time which also celebrates the last harvest ensures blessings and that fertility to the land is returned in spring.  The ancient Greeks would often leave offerings to Hekate in order for their crops not to fail and for her storm aspect to be pacified.  Considering winter is a time of storms and the earth lays dormant, getting Hekate on your good side with respects to these aspects is forward thinking.

I personally see that during Mabon (Autumn Equinox) is when Hekate, torches in hand, guides and protects Persephone as she descends into the underworld.  At Samhain, Hekate has returned from the Underworld with news from the Dead, as she is one of the few gods who can traverse between all the worlds.

Constructing a dumb supper for Hekate and your ancestors is a wonderful way to honour them both by placing a plate of food that Hekate and your ancestors would appreciate then leaving it on a Hekate or ancestor altar, on a crossroads or on your doorsteps ensures they will take on the essence of the food offered.

Offerings to your ancestors can include food they enjoyed during life and offerings to Hekate that compliments Samhain includes apples, pomegranates, garlic, onion, wine, mead and mugwort tea.

Here is a simple witches ritual for Hekate, Samhain and your ancestors I have composed and used successfully multiple times in years past:

Setjataset Samhain Rite ((C) T. Georgitsis 2010)

Ingredients:

  • Dumb Supper (any of the foods and drinks your ancestors loved in life)
  • Coins (3) – of any denomination which can be donated
  • Incense – dragons blood, frankincense or livani
  • Candles (1-3) – tea lights are easiest but you can use tapers
  • Image of Hekate
  • Key – skeleton if you have it but any key will do
  • Skull – crystal, animal bone or a copy
  • Divination form – tarot cards, scrying bowl, mirror, dice
  • Any offerings you would like infused with the energies of Samhain
  • Pen and Paper

Method:

Prepare a dumb supper and place in the NW of your circle or on the left of your altar/shrine.

Create sacred space or open the shrine.

Light some incense.

Inscribe the candle with the ancestors names you would like to connect with and place before the image of Hekate.

Take the three coins and blow on them before placing them in front of the candle.

Light the candle which has been placed in the middle of your altar before the image of Hekate.  This is used as a beacon so your deceased loved ones can make their way to you.

Have a key and an image of a skull on the left side of your alter/shrine.

Any form of divination should be placed on your shrine after giving the item/s a little shake.

Begin the rite by evoking Hekate with the following Orphic hymn (or any hymn you resonate with which fits the season and purpose):

Hekate Einodia, Trioditis, lovely dame, of earthly, watery, and celestial frame, sepulchral, in a saffron veil arrayed, pleased with dark ghosts that wander through the shade; Perseis, solitary goddess, hail! The world’s key-bearer, never doomed to fail; in stags rejoicing, huntress, nightly seen, and drawn by bulls, unconquerable queen; Leader, Nymphe, nurse, on mountains wandering, hear the suppliants who with holy rites thy power revere, and to the herdsman with a favouring mind draw near.

Take the key and tap the top of the skull three times and repeat the following chant:

Hekate we ask that you open the gates of Hades
and allow our ancestors to traverse to us this night.

Guide our loved ones who have passed over,
to us with your wisdom and might.

Bring our ancestors of old and new
with you to share with us their gift of foresight.

Great Goddess we seek to commune with them
in the name of all that is light.

Bless us for we pay homage to you and
our departed ones in this very rite.

Commune with your ancestors and use your divination tools to see what the year has in store for you or ask any specific questions that you have.  Write them down with your pen and paper so you can reflect and refer to them later.

Thank and farewell your ancestors and Hekate.

Close sacred space or close the shrine.

Dispose the offerings by leaving them at a base of a tree, putting them in a compost, burying them in your garden or leaving them safely at a crossroads.

Donate your coins to a charity.


(C) T. Georgitsis 2010, Updated 2020

 

Hekate Magick: Four Thieves Vinegar

Four Thieves Vinegar also known as Prophylactic Vinegar or Marseilles Vinegar/Remedy, is a health tonic made from vinegar, herbs, spices and garlic which was created in the middle ages to protect against the plague (black death).  Similar concoctions have been made as far back as the time of Hippocrates in Ancient Greece.

The basic recipe for the remedy is adding certain herbs to be placed and steeped in a vinegar solution for several days.

In the current climate of Corvid-19 it can be used as powerful disinfectant.  

I created an original recipe several years ago.  This recipe is based on a medieval recipe and has modern ingredients added which I personally found useful:

Setjataset’s Four Thieves Vinegar Recipe (© T. Georgitsis 2014)

Ingredients

  • Vinegar (rice wine or apple cider) – 2 litres
  • Wormwood (1 tablespoon)
  • Sage (1 tablespoon)
  • Marjoram (1 tablespoon)
  • Meadowsweet (1 tablespoon)
  • Campala Root (3 tablespoons)
  • Angelic Root (3 tablespoons)
  • Rosemary (3 tablespoons)
  • Horehound(3 tablespoons)
  • Champhor (3 tablespoons)
  • Thyme (2 tablespoons) – modern addition
  • Mint (2 tablespoons) – modern addition 
  • Lavender (2 tablespoons)
  • Cloves (25 cloves)
  • Rue (3 tablespoons) – optional
  • Garlic (3 cloves) – optional

Method

  1. Add dried herbs to vinegar solution.
  2. Before closing the lid put some cling wrap to stop metal lid from corroding.
  3. Steep for 3 weeks in a secure glass jar, in a cool dark place.
  4. Strain solution through cheesecloth and then bottle securely in smaller jars.

Simple Use for Four Thieves Vinegar

Use as a disinfectant or house cleaning agent.

Cautions
DO NOT TAKE INTERNALLY!
DO NOT USE IF PREGNANT OR LACTATING!
DO NOT USE/TAKE IF YOU HAVE ALLERGIES TO INGREDIENTS MENTIONED!

 

Recently I created an amended version of my Four Thieves Vinegar in dedication to Hekate which I made in conjunction with a prayer for plague protection I wrote in honour of her.

My suggestion is to repeat the prayer before you start making the vinegar, after you have created the vinegar and left it to steep and once again after you have decanted the final product, once it has been strained.

Here is my recipe for the Hekate’s Four Thieves Vinegar:

Setjataset’s Hekate Four Thieves Vinegar (© T. Georgitsis 2020)

  • Vinegar (apple cider) – 1 litre
  • Wormwood (1 tablespoon)
  • Sage (1 tablespoon)
  • Rosemary (2 tablespoons)
  • Thyme (2 tablespoons)
  • Mint (2 tablespoons)
  • Lavender (2 tablespoons) – culinary not aromatic
  • Cloves (5 cloves)
  • Garlic (3 bulbs) – optional
  • Bay Leaves (1 leaf) – optional

Method

  1. Add fresh herbs to a jar.
  2. Cover herbs with vinegar solution.
  3. Before closing the lid put some cling wrap to stop metal lid from corroding.
  4. Steep for 3 weeks in a secure glass jar in a cool dark place.
  5. Strain solution through cheesecloth and then bottle securely in smaller jars.

Simple Use for Hekate Four Thieves Vinegar 

  1. 1 teaspoon diluted in a room temperature glass of water to be drunk once a week.
  2. 1 tablespoon in a bath once a week.
  3. 1 tablespoon in a small spray bottle to use on surfaces as required/daily.

Cautions
DO NOT TAKE IF PREGNANT OR LACTATING!
DO NOT USE/TAKE IF YOU HAVE ALLERGIES TO INGREDIENTS MENTIONED!

Here is the prayer I wrote for Hekate to go with the creation of her vinegar:

Hekate Prayer for Plague Protection (© T. Georgitsis 2020)

Hekate Alexeatis

I call to you as Averter of Evil

Keep this virus away from me (and my loved ones)

Hekate Aregos

I call to you as Helper

Help me (and my loved ones) to keep safe from this pandemic

Hekate Episkopos

I call to you as Guardian

Guard me (and my loved ones) against Corona-18

Hekate Ekdotis

I call to you as Bestower

Bring to me (and my loved ones) health and vitality 

Hekate Propolos

I call to you as Guide

Assist me (and my loved ones) during this difficult time

Hekate Soteira

I call to you as Saviour

Be there for me (and my loved ones) 


 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2014, Updated 2020

Mystic Tribe Magazine: April 2020, Issue #29

In my regular column on crystals, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, I have written an article called “Chakra Stones which describes the 7 chakras as well as the 3 alternative/extra ones.  I have also included which crystals resonate with these chakras and how you can charge, program and use them for the benefit of these chakras. For your FREE copy follow this link:

Mystic Tribe – April 2020, Issue 29

 

 

 

Hekate Magick: Khernips (Sacred Water)

Circe by John William Waterhouse

 

Khernips which is also known as lustral water is blessed or sacred water which is employed in Hellenic rites and can be used in the devotional workings of Hekate.

Khernips is primarily used for libations, offerings and to purge oneself of miasma (environmental and energetic pollutants believed to cause illness by the Ancient Greeks and modern Hellenes).  It can also be used to heal body/mind/spirit/emotion and can be consumed for internal use or applied externally (depending on the properties).

Khernips can be employed to bless or consecrate anything from shrine/altar tools, jewellery and places of practice, to plants, people and pets.  Washing one’s hands with blessed water before entering into ritual was common practice for the Ancient Greeks as it was believed to keep miasma at bay.  Khernips can be also used to put out a ritual fire, to wash ritual clothing and for use in practical and ceremonial magic, such as where one creates objects for specific purposes like a talisman from clay and water.

The Ancient Greeks made their khernips simply by collecting it from a sacred spring or well and storing it in a jug or similar vessel for devotional use.  The same technique can be employed now, however if you are collecting from a spring, be sure to leave an appropriate offerings like coins, flowers or herbs.

Another way to make this sanctified water is as easy as colleting rain water and purifying it.  My favourite technique of making khernips is collecting sea water. This can be ritualistically done by placing the vessel just on the shore line and collecting the water through a wave as it comes towards you. Several other methods of khernips I have successfully used over the years includes: mixing kosher rock salt and purified water, herbal/flower water (orange blossom, lavender, rose and angelica for Hekate), aromatherapy water utilising cold pressed essential oil and another method is purified water mixed with wine (sweet pine wine or any robust wine).

The way you can use khernips is by placing it in a glass lidded container for storage and then pouring it into a bowl or jug for ritual use.  You can then dip your hands into the bowl or alternatively pour the khernips over your hands from a jug to purify yourself before rites.  Use a bundle of tied up herbs to asperge* with or alternatively use your hands to sprinkle it over things like offerings, tools and sacred space.  Also putting khernips in a spray bottle to be able to diffuse it within an area works very well, as does using a water bottle or a bottle with a dripper. Some khernips, especially those having plant materials, need to be refrigerated or alternatively a preservative needs to be added such as a dash of wheat germ oil, olive oil or pure alcohol to keep it from going rancid.

This is a simple khernips creation and blessing I created as part of my regular devotional use for Hekate which I would like to share:

Setjataset’s Khernips Blessing ((C)T. Georgitsis 2013)

Ingredients:

  • Dried Bay Leaf
  • Purified Water (filtered water)

Method:

Light the end of a dried bay laurel leaf and say:

I banish all that is unclean, corrupt and profane with the aid of Hekate!

Plunge the lit end into the water and say:

It is purified, upright and sanctified in Hekate’s name.

You can employ the same method by holding some rock salt over a bowl of water, sprinkling the rock salt over the water and finishing off by swivelling around the mixture in the bowl with both hands.

Suggested Use for Khernips:

    1. To purify yourself before and after ritual.
    2. To remove miasma* from people, animals, physical items or spaces.
    3. To be used for libations in ritual and magickal workings.
    4. To be used as offerings.
    5. To water sacred plants, herbs and trees.

*Asperge = to sprinkle with sacred water.

(C) T. Georgitsis 2014, Updated 2020