Khalkeia Festival

On the 20th of October, the Hellenic Khalkeia festival is observed.

The Khalkeia is a festival celebrating and is devoted to Hephaistos, Athena Ergane and the Khalkeia (patrons of artisans).

This is an auspicious time to celebrate crafting and to make devotional crafts.

Offer meat and grain.

Here is a hymn to Hephaestus you can read out during your devotionals:

Homeric Hymn 20 To Hephaestus

 Sing, clear-voiced Muse, of Hephaestus famed for inventions.
With bright-eyed Athena he taught men glorious crafts throughout the world,
—men who before used to dwell in caves in the mountains like wild beasts.
But now that they have learned crafts through Hephaestus the famed worker,
easily they live a peaceful life in their own houses the whole year round.

Be gracious, Hephaestus, and grant me success and prosperity!

English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White

 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2017

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We Are The Witches – A Poem

We are the ones who rise
We are the cursers
We are the crafters

We are the ones who heal
We are the charmers
We are the wise

We are the ones who dare
We are the quiet fury
We are the witches

(C) Image and Prose: T Georgitsis 2017

 

 

Through the storm

Strange Flowers

Artist and occultist Rosaleen Norton was born a hundred years ago today in Dunedin, New Zealand, with a thunderstorm raging across the city and war rampaging throughout the world – and frankly things never really got a lot calmer for ol’ Roie. After she adopted my hometown of Sydney as her own she became a constant magnet for controversy, the “Witch of Kings Cross”. As previously reported, there is a documentary of that name about Norton in the works and it seems to be shaping up well – see here for progress. The interviews look especially promising, and I recognise a few old Sydney faces among the talking heads. For all her eccentricity and a tendency to play up to her infamy, what emerges when you delve deeper into Rosaleen Norton’s life is a genuinely charismatic and essentially genial character with an earnest interest in paths less travelled, left-hand…

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Pyanepsia Festival

On the 28th of September, the Hellenic Pyanepsia festival is observed.

The Pyanepsia is a festival celebrating and is devoted to Apollo,  Theseus, Helios and the Horai (the goddesses of the seasons and time).

This is an auspicious time to celebrate the harvest festival whilst retelling the myths of Theseus.  Make an eiresione (take a branch of olive, laurel or from a fruit tree and place around it strings of white or purple wool.  Add fruits, pastries, cakes, acorns to decorate and place on the front door of the home to protect the hearth against ill will.

Avoid meat and offer honey, olive oil, figs, bread, panspermia,  (the meal which was offered to Apollo for the safe travel from Delos to Attica by Theseus), fruit and pastries.

Here is a retelling of the Life of Plutarch you can read out during your devotionals:

(C) T. Georgitsis

Oskhophoria Festival

On the 28th of September, the Hellenic Oskhophoria festival is observed.

The Oskhophoria is a festival celebrating the grape harvest and is devoted to Dionysus and Athena (Skira).

This is an auspicious time to work with protection, specifically of the hearth.

Offer grapes, vine leaves and wine.

Here is a poem you can use in your devotionals:

Dionysus 

(C) T. Georgitsis

Proerosia Festival

On the 27th of September, the Hellenic Proerosia festival is observed.

The Proerosia is a festival of “first fruits” devoted to the time of plowing.

This is an auspicious time to honor Demeter.

Offer seeds, fruit, flowers and herbs.

Here is a hymn you can use in your devotionals:

Homeric Hymn to Demeter

Eleusinian Mysteries

On the 6th till the 12th of September, the Hellenic Eleusinian Mysteries is observed.

The Eleusinian Mysteries is a time celebrating  Demeter and Persephone’s mystery cults in the town of Eleusis outside of Athens.

This is an auspicious time to dedicate yourself to your Hellenic Gods or traditions or retake your vows with the same.

Offer symbols of rebirth like wheat.

Here is a hymn you can use in your devotionals:

Homeric Hymn to Demeter (translated by Gregory Nagy)

Homeric Hymn to Demeter

 

(C) T. Georgitsis

Demokratia Festival

On the 3rd of September, the Hellenic Demokratia festival is observed.

The Demokratia is a festival celebrating democracy in Athens and is devoted to Themis, Zeaus Agoraios and Athena Agoraia (which are all gods connected to the sacred agora ie marketplace).

This is an auspicious time to celebrate democracy in our lives which was created by the Ancient Greeks.

Offer incense such as frankinscense.

Here is a hymn you can use in your devotionals:

Orphic Hymn to Themis

Illustrious Themis, of celestial birth, thee I invoke, young blossom of the earth; 
Beauteous-eyed virgin; first from thee alone, prophetic oracles to men were known,
Giv’n from the deep recesses of the fane in sacred Pytho, where renown’d you reign;
From thee, Apollo’s oracles arose, and from thy pow’r his inspiration flows.
Honour’d by all, of form divinely bright, majestic virgin, wand’ring in the night: 
Mankind from thee first learnt initial rites, and Bacchus’ nightly choirs thy soul delights;
For holy honours to disclose is thine, with all the culture of the pow’rs divine.
Be present, Goddess, to my pray’r inclin’d, and bless the mystic rites with fav’ring mind.

(C) T. Georgitsis

Artemis Agrotera/Kharisteria

On the 28th of August, the Hellenic Artemis Agrotera/Kharisteria festival is observed.

The Agrotera/Kharisteria is a festival of feasting which is dedicated to Artemis the Huntress.

This is an auspicious time to celebrate success in battles and in modern times victory over what you’ve been fighting for.

Offer meat such as goat or lamb.

Here is a hymn you can use in your devotionals:

Hymn to Artemis

I sing of Artemis, whose shafts are of gold, who cheers on the hounds, the pure maiden, shooter of stags, who delights in archery, own sister to Apollo with the golden sword. Over the shadowy hills and windy peaks she draws her golden bow, rejoicing in the chase, and sends out grievous shafts. The tops of the high mountains tremble and the tangled wood echoes awesomely with the outcry of beasts: earth quakes and the sea also where fishes shoal. But the goddess with a bold heart turns every way destroying the race of wild beasts: and when she is satisfied and has cheered her heart, this huntress who delights in arrows slackens her supple bow and goes to the great house of her dear brother Phoebus Apollo, to the rich land of  Delphi.  There to order the lovely dance of the Muses and Graces. There she hangs up her curved bow and her arrows, and heads and leads the dances, gracefully arrayed, while all they utter their heavenly voice, singing how neat-ankled Leto bare children supreme among the immortals both in thought and in deed.Hail to you, children of Zeus and rich-haired Leto! And now I will remember you and another song also. 

 

(C) T. Georgitsis

 

Genesios Festival

On the 27th of August, the Hellenic festival of Genesios is observed.

This is a festival which is dedicated to the dead.

This is an auspicious time to honor your ancestors who have passed.  Visit their grave or memorials and remember the things they did in life.

Offerings which can be made during this time include water, incense, flowers, bay laurel, honey and milk.

Here is a prayer you can use to honor on this day which I wrote for my ancestors:

Imperishable Stars

Imperishable Stars

Never to rise nor set

Your luminous hearts fixed

Watching in abject silence

Epithets eternally emblazoned

Within and upon your earthly kin

Eternally through the promised premise

Incandescent in dogging darkness

(C) T. Georgitsis 2016