Books on Hekate

I have updated this list to include new or upcoming books or ones I feel should be included in Hekate related books 😀

Setjataset

Some (if not most) devotees, priests, witches, magicians and practitioners of Hekate love to find out more about her from a historical, modern, personal, religious and magical point of view.  They love to read and research Hekate, and therefore tend to devour everything they can find, which is written and discussed on Her.

For me personally, I like to collect books on Hekate for my personal library.  I do this so I can understand academic’s research and study on Hekate as well as individual’s personal experience and interpretation on her. I love to read how Hekate manifests for others who have a deep interest, love and respect for Hekate.  Although I don’t necessarily agree or resonate with everything I read, I find it expands my perspective and knowledge about her in a more well rounded way.

Over the last few years I have noticed more books being written on Hekate which can…

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Isian News: Issue #179, Brigantia 2021

 

In the latest issue of Isian News by the Fellowship of Isis, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, my Lyceum of Heka (my teaching school within the fellowship) news features my article about Dancing for Hekate.   For your FREE copy follow this link:

Isian News: Issue #179, Brigantia 2021

Mystic Tribe Magazine: February 2021, Issue #39

 

In my regular column on crystals, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, I have written an Ancient Egyptian themed article called “Heka (Ancient Egypt Magick) which describes what Heka is along with a simple piece of Heka for you to try utilising a crystal wand.   For your FREE copy follow this link:

Issue 39 Mystic Tribe Magazine February 2021

Resolutions 2021

Many create resolutions at the beginning of the new year.  These resolutions can include getting rid of a bad habits or introducing a good one.  Resolutions tend to be created and promises made – which usually (if not always) fall by the wayside.

This is why I as I have described before I personally do not create resolutions.  What I like to do is set intentions of what I want to undergo for the year with the focus being on what new “experience” I want to learn or immerse myself in.

Last year what quite an intense one and as such most of my time was spent on survival and self-care.

My focus for the year is listed below in bold, whilst my achievements are listed beneath with supporting lists, links or photographs.

Read and re-read books which inspire and/or move me:

GoodRead List 2020

I didn’t read as many books as I usually do due to spending a lot of time reading academic papers on Academia as well as subscribing to Medium and reading various articles there by independent writers.

Support more artists creating hand-made/self-published items born from their hard work, research, study and/or imagination:

Miss Marley Art

The Woodpecker

TitchyYosies

MUMA

LeRoux Manor

The Quirky Cup Collective

Luna Noire Creations

Rapt n Hide

B Inspired Art

Woodspinning

Fiona Ariva

Reclaimed Red Gum Eucalyptus Floating Ledges (c) The Woodpecker

Support a charity I resonate with:

Share the Dignity

Guide Dog Australia

Run For Refugees

Sister Works

STEPtember

Meow Rescue

Cotton On Foundation

Nefertiti & Ramesses (c) T. Georgitsis

Visit somewhere I haven’t been before which has a spirit of place:

Dromana Beach (been there as a child but not as an adult).

Mornington peninsular (visited various places of the area).

Healesville Sanctuary

Dromana Beach 12/2020 (c) T. Georgitsis

Dromana Beach 12/2020 (c) T. Georgitsis

Complete a workshop/course which is connected to my interests, passions and causes I like to support:

Handwriting Course (Cursive)

Caligraphy Course 

Self Publishing Workshop

Librarian Course 

Create something magical which feeds and inspires my practice:

Painting with acrylics – submitted and accepted to Gallery Exhibit 5 x 9 (painting sold)

Photography of Spirit of Place – submitted and accepted to Optica 2020 Exhibit

Card Making with Kemetic, Hellenic, Magical and Witch Themes

Letter Writing by Hand

Typewriter Poetry

Journalling which included a pandemic diary, magical spell book, magical grimoire and poetic journal with mixed media, watercolour, acrylic and ink drawings.

Blogging – Occult/Magical and Creative Writing 

Craft Making (candles, soap, anointing oils, incense blends, herb bundles)

Cooking various new meals which includes celebratory offerings 

Created new spells utilising Greek Folk Magic practises 

Planted more herbs and focused on cultivating and preserving ones used in Greek and Egyptian magic.

“Blue” 9×5 Exhibition (C) T. Georigitsis

“Diva Connection” Optika20 (c) T. Georgitsis

Attended Conference with a Magical/Spiritual Slant :

AWC 2020

HoN End of Year Festivities – Epagomenial Days & Wep Ronpet 

LIFE is about experiences and the way I feel when I – create, visit or support something which inspires and uplifts me.  I find its easier to get energised and complete set objectives if I find personal purpose within the task before me.

Therefore my suggestion for those wanting to set resolutions who then struggle to fulfil them, is to instead write a wish list of intentions, of things you would like to do – to feed your soul and go from there.  That way there is less pressure as the focus is more pleasure in your life.

(C) T Georgitsis – all images and text 2020

Hekate Devotion: Lammas/Lughnasadh

Lammas or Lughnasadh is the first autumn festival in the Southern Hemisphere calendar. This year it falls on the 4th of February at 12.40am. I was introduced to this festival when I studied Wicca back in my teens and then was exposed to a celebration of it when I was in my first Wiccan coven in my early 20’s.

Historically its a Celtic festival which celebrates the First Harvest of the Fruits such as apples, grapes, tomatoes, peaches, plums but also celebrates the harvest of the first grain, wheat, oats and corn. Therefore traditionally the fruit gathered is made into preserves and the grains and corn made into bread or cakes.

I grew up with an immigrant Greek family and during this time of year they would make large stores of Passata due to it being used so often in their cooking. My father also made home made moonshine using whatever was abundant and in season as well as his own wine and beer. My mother made Pita from home grown spinach and/or horta and fennel, stuffed vine leaves and also various Greek shortbreads and cakes.  They would both share what they made with family and friends as it was common practice where they grew up and brought that tradition here to Australia when they immigrated.

These days I continue a version of their traditions as I infuse store bought wine with homegrown Greek herbs, make passata from the tomatoes out of my garden, as well as bake traditional Greek village bread and Greek biscuits using organic ingredients. I have also used this time for years to make plum jam from my garden’s Victorian heirloom organic plums (due to the trees originally being part of a farm in the area before it was sub-divided into housing).  These items created from the seasonal harvest are offered to my Gods, Ancestors and loved ones where appropriate.

Due to been heavily influenced by the way I was raised, my rituals are a mix of honouring my personal Gods, ancestors and also honouring the land I live on.  I see this as a perfect blend of personal devotion as someone who works with the Gods, local spirits and venerates her ancestors in a modern way.  I don’t have any strong connection to the God Lugh, typically honoured during this time of year, so I personally use it as a harvest festival and honour my household Gods: Hekate with a libation set aside to Hestia. Other Gods which I have honoured during his time include Persephone, Demeter, Mercury and Apollo.


If like me if you honour any of the above Gods, you can make Greek shortbread or cheesecake for Hekate, pomegranate infused cakes or salads for Persephone, honey or sesame biscuits for Demeter, home made wine for Mercury and home made beer for Apollo.

Its also a good time to make and dedicate devotional items you have crafted yourself over the summer. I tend to make and dedicate items to specific Gods utilising items from my garden due to it resonating with the vibe of the season and festival. Growing a lot of herbs, the ones which are in season, I collect preserve and store them for future use in Hekate’s name for various magical purposes.  I also collect resin, bark, leaves and branches from some of my trees to be used in items such as incense, waters, oils and magical tools.

I feel magically used crafts such as candles and incense are perfect to infuse with the energies of the season especially if we are able to harness these energies and channel them into the items.  I also tend to make preserves which I use in offerings thorough the remainder of the year

Also its a good time to acknowledge the ancestors and leave them some food offerings as a form of ancestor veneration. I usually leave some food they liked in life such as kalamata olives, feta, stuffed vine leaves my mother taught me to make along with some Greek coffee which I can scry and divine with.

So even though the Hekate and Ancestral traditions of spirituality and magick I work, doesn’t sound like it fits exactly within the Lammas/Lughnasadh festival – I make it work for me and you can too as the most important thing I feel is devotion and dedication to your path whatever form that takes.


(c) T. Georgitsis 2020

 

 

 

 

2021 Sabbat Dates: Southern Hemisphere

Astrological sabbat dates for the Southern Hemisphere for 2021:

Lughnasadh/
Lammas
February 4, 2021 12:40am First autumn harvest festival.
Mabon/
Autumnal Equinox
March 20, 2021 7:37pm Day and night have same length. Days get shorter.
Samhain May 5, 2021
4:36pm
Veil between worlds thinnest.
Yule/
Winter Solstice
June 21, 2021
1:32pm
Day has the longest night.  Sun is at its lowest elevation in the sky.
Imbolc August 7, 2021
4:53pm
Marks the beginning of spring.
Ostara/
Spring Equinox
September 23, 2021
5:21am
Day and night have same length. Days get longer.
Beltane November 7, 2021 2:50pm Halfway point between spring and summer. Fertility festival.
Litha/
Summer Solstice
December 22, 2021 1:59am Day has the longest daylight. Sun travels the longest path through the sky.

All times are Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST) – add 1 hour for Daylight Savings Time when applicable.

(C) T. Georgitsis 2021

Mystic Tribe Magazine: January 2021, Issue #38

 

In my regular column on crystals, in the latest issue of Mystic Tribe Magazine, I have written an article called “Crystal Balls which describes how to acquire, prepare, activate and use a crystal ball for scrying.   For your FREE copy follow this link:

Issue 38 Mystic Tribe Magazine January 2021

Special Moons of 2021

Moon magick is a practice I strongly resonate with. I love to create and venerate with the various phases of moon.  I love to engage in the moon’s ebbs and flows where I can move with the energies and enact rites with and for my Gods and Ancestors.  Regardless of what path I practice, regardless of what sorcery I perform the moon is my guide through it all – a guiding presence for my workings.

This year we have various unique moons coming up where you can practice your full and new moon rituals and spell-work with added punch due to the added significance of these moons.  There are different types of magick you can create during these various significant moon phases which can assist you with your practice.

Listed below I have created various pages explaining the different moons and what magick you can practice in the associated links:

 

Super Full Moon: 27th April 2021 – Super Moon Magick

Micro New Moon: 12 May 2021 – Micro Moon Magick

Total Lunar Eclipse: 26th May 2021 –  Lunar Eclipse Magick
Super Full Moon: 26th May 2021 – Super Moon Magick

Blue Moon: 22nd August 2021 –  Blue Moon Magick

Super New Moon: 5th August 2021 – Super Moon Magick

Partial Lunar Eclipse: 19th November 2021 – Lunar Eclipse Magick
Micro Full Moon: 19th November 2021 –  Micro Moon Magick

Super New Moon: 4th December 2021 – Super Moon Magick

Micro Full Moon: 19th December 2021 – Micro Moon Magick

 

 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2021

2021 Moon Phases: Southern Hemisphere

 

As a magical practitioner I like to work with the phases of the moon.  I find these useful for various rituals, devotionals, spells and other magical workings.

Moon Phases for Eastern Standard Time in Australia for 2021:

New Moon

First Quarter (Waxing) Full Moon Third Quarter (Waning)
6 Jan 8:37 pm
13 Jan 4:00 pm 21 Jan 8:01 am 29 Jan 6:16 am 5 Feb 4:37 am
12 Feb 6:05 am 20 Feb 5:47 am 27 Feb 7:17 pm 6 Mar 12:30 pm
13 Mar 9:21 pm 22 Mar 1:40 am 29 Mar 5:48 am 4 Apr 8:02 pm
12 Apr 12:30 pm 20 Apr 4:58 pm 27 Apr 1:31 pm 4 May 5:50 am
12 May 4:59 am 20 May 5:12 am 26 May 9:13 pm 2 Jun 5:24 pm
10 Jun 8:52 pm 18 Jun 1:54 pm 25 Jun 4:39 am 2 Jul 7:10 am
10 Jul 11:16 am 17 Jul 8:10 pm 24 Jul 12:36 pm 31 Jul 11:15 pm
8 Aug 11:50 pm 16 Aug 1:19 am 22 Aug 10:01 pm 30 Aug 5:13 pm
7 Sep 10:51 am 14 Sep 6:39 am 21 Sep 9:54 am 29 Sep 11:57 am
6 Oct 10:05 pm 13 Oct 2:25 pm 21 Oct 1:56 am 29 Oct 7:05 am
5 Nov 8:14 am 11 Nov 11:45 pm 19 Nov 7:57 pm 27 Nov 11:27 pm
4 Dec 6:43 pm 11 Dec 12:35 pm 19 Dec 3:35 pm 27 Dec 1:23 pm

Some magickal workings which can be conducted on the following moon phases:

Full Moon (Psychic & Manifestation Work)

Waxing Moon (Invoking/Bringing In Workings)

Wanning Moon (Banishing/Pushing Out Workings)

New Moon (Psychic & Invoking Work)

Dark Moon (Banishing & Divination Workings)

 

(C) T. Georgitsis 2021

Athenian Calendar 2020/21 (Southern Hemisphere)

Image by Konstantin Arzumanidis

The best time to honor Hekate is the Deipnon and Noumenia.  With that said, every year I create an Athenian Calendar to calculate the Deipnon and Noumenia using the Southern Hemisphere New Moons, to ensure my devotions are on the right evenings for my location.  This is calculated by the start off point of the Summer Solstice in Greece of that particular year.

The Athenian Calendar also known as the Attic Calendar was a lunisolar calendar used during the classical period of Ancient Greece during the 4th and 5th Centuries BC.  It was exclusively used in Athens at the time and each month starts at the first sighting of the new moon, with the year beginning just after mid-summer.  It’s become a modern go to for practicing Hellenics and as such, what we use and have today is a reconstruction of what they used around 300-500 BC.  I have superimposed this Athenian Calendar over our modern Gregorian one, to loosely create a festival calendar of 12 months based on the cycle of the moon which starts at the beginning of the Athenian year – on the summer solstice in Athens. The names of the months reflect the gods and festivals honoured at that time and have agricultural links to the planting or harvesting of food in the northern hemisphere.

Here is what the yearly Athenian Calendar basically looks like:

Summer (Θέρος)

1          Hekatombaion (Ἑκατομβαιών)           July/August

2          Metageitnion (Μεταγειτνιών)             August/September (named after Apollo)

3          Boedromion (Βοηδρομιών)                September/October

Autumn (Φθινόπωρον)

4          Pyanepsion (Πυανεψιών)                    October/November

5          Maimakterion (Μαιμακτηριών)          November/December (named after Zeus)

6          Poseideon (Ποσειδεών)                      December/January

Winter (Χεῖμα)

7          Gamelion (Γαμηλιών)                         January/February

8          Anthesterion (Ἀνθεστηριών)              February/March (named after the festival of Anthesteria)

9          Elaphebolion (Ἑλαφηβολιών)             March/April

Spring (Ἔαρ)

10        Mounichion (Μουνιχιών)                    April/May

11        Thargelion (Θαργηλιών)                     May/June

12        Skirophorion (Σκιροφοριών)              June/July

 

Every month lasts for approximately 29-30 days in total.  Each month is broken up into 10 days of three which reflect the moon phases in the following order: Waxing, Full and Waning Moons.

Days 1 to 8 were all sacred to gods or spirit entities and the last day of the month, known as “hene kai nea” translated as “the old and the new”, is dedicate to Hekate as it’s her Deipnon along with the first day of the month, Noumenia which is also dedicated to Hekate.

Here are the details of those 8 sacred days in the Athenian Calendar month:

Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon)

Day 2: Agathos Daimon

Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

Day 29-30: Deipnon

To get you all started with adapting the Athenian Calendar to the Gregorian one, here is the Athenian Calendar I created for 2021, calculated for Southern Hemisphere practitioners:

21 June 2020 (12.43am), = Summer Solstice in Greece (Winter Solstice in Australia 21st June 7.43am AEST)

 

Summer (Θέρος)

1 Hekatombaion (Ἑκατομβαιών)

21 July – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 3.32am Athenian New Year 

22 July – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

23 July – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

24 July – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

26 July – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

27 July – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

28 July – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

17-18 August – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

2 Metageitnion (Μεταγειτνιών) (named after Apollo)

19 August – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 12.41pm

20 August – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

21 August – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

22 August – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

24 August – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

25 August – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

26 August – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

15-16 September – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

3 Boedromion (Βοηδρομιών)

17 September – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 9.00pm

18 September – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

19 September – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

20 September – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

22 September – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

23 September – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

24 September – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

15-16 October – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

Autumn (Φθινόπωρον)

4 Pyanepsion (Πυανεψιών)

17 October – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 6.31am

18 October – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

19 October – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

20 October – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

22 October – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

23 October – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

24 October – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

13-14 November – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

5 Maimakterion (Μαιμακτηριών) (named after Zeus)

15 November – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 4.07pm

16 November – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

17 November – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

18 November – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

20 November – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

21 November – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

22 November – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

13-14 December – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

6 Poseideon (Ποσειδεών)

15 December – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 3.06am

28 November – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

29 November – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

30 November – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

2 December – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

3 December – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

4 December – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

12-13 January – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

Winter (Χεῖμα)

7 Gamelion (Γαμηλιών)

13 January – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 4.00pm

14 January – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

15 January – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

16 January – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Eros

18 January – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

19 January – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

20 January – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

10-11 February – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

8 Anthesterion (Ἀνθεστηριών) (named after the festival of Anthesteria)

12 February – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 6.05am

13 February – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

14 February – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

15 February – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

17 February- Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

18 February – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

19 February – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

11-12 March  – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

9 Elaphebolion (Ἑλαφηβολιών)

13 March – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 9.21pm

14 March – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

15 March – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

16 March – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

18 March – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

19 March – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

20 March – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

10-11 April – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

Spring (Ἔαρ)

10 Mounichion (Μουνιχιών)

12 April – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 12.30pm

13 April – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

14 April – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

15 April – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

17 April – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

18 April – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

19 April – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

10-11 May – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

11 Thargelion (Θαργηλιών) 

12 May – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 4.59am

13 May – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

14 May – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

15 May – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

17 May – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

18 May – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

19 May – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

8-9 June – Day 29-30: Deipnon

 

12 Skirophorion (Σκιροφοριών)   

10 June – Day 1: Noumenia (New Moon) 8.52pm

11 June – Day 2: Agathos Daimon

12 June – Day 3: Athena’s Birthday

13 June – Day 4: Heracles, Hermes, Aphrodite and Erosc

15 June – Day 6: Artemis’ Birthday

16 June – Day 7: Apollo’s Birthday

17 June – Day 8: Poseidon and Theseus (Mikalson 1975: 24)

8-9 July – Day 29-30: Deipnon

(C) T. Georgitsis 2021